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I tried the Go Tour exercise #71

If it is run like go run 71_hang.go ok, it works fine.

However, if you use go run 71_hang.go nogood, it will run forever.

The only difference is the extra fmt.Print("") in the default in the select statement.

I'm not sure, but I suspect some sort of infinite loop and race-condition? And here is my solution.

Note: It's not deadlock as Go didn't throw: all goroutines are asleep - deadlock!

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
)

type Fetcher interface {
    // Fetch returns the body of URL and
    // a slice of URLs found on that page.
    Fetch(url string) (body string, urls []string, err error)
}

func crawl(todo Todo, fetcher Fetcher,
    todoList chan Todo, done chan bool) {
    body, urls, err := fetcher.Fetch(todo.url)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    } else {
        fmt.Printf("found: %s %q\n", todo.url, body)
        for _, u := range urls {
            todoList <- Todo{u, todo.depth - 1}
        }
    }
    done <- true
    return
}

type Todo struct {
    url   string
    depth int
}

// Crawl uses fetcher to recursively crawl
// pages starting with url, to a maximum of depth.
func Crawl(url string, depth int, fetcher Fetcher) {
    visited := make(map[string]bool)
    doneCrawling := make(chan bool, 100)
    toDoList := make(chan Todo, 100)
    toDoList <- Todo{url, depth}

    crawling := 0
    for {
        select {
        case todo := <-toDoList:
            if todo.depth > 0 && !visited[todo.url] {
                crawling++
                visited[todo.url] = true
                go crawl(todo, fetcher, toDoList, doneCrawling)
            }
        case <-doneCrawling:
            crawling--
        default:
            if os.Args[1]=="ok" {   // *
                fmt.Print("")
            }
            if crawling == 0 {
                goto END
            }
        }
    }
END:
    return
}

func main() {
    Crawl("http://golang.org/", 4, fetcher)
}

// fakeFetcher is Fetcher that returns canned results.
type fakeFetcher map[string]*fakeResult

type fakeResult struct {
    body string
    urls []string
}

func (f *fakeFetcher) Fetch(url string) (string, []string, error) {
    if res, ok := (*f)[url]; ok {
        return res.body, res.urls, nil
    }
    return "", nil, fmt.Errorf("not found: %s", url)
}

// fetcher is a populated fakeFetcher.
var fetcher = &fakeFetcher{
    "http://golang.org/": &fakeResult{
        "The Go Programming Language",
        []string{
            "http://golang.org/pkg/",
            "http://golang.org/cmd/",
        },
    },
    "http://golang.org/pkg/": &fakeResult{
        "Packages",
        []string{
            "http://golang.org/",
            "http://golang.org/cmd/",
            "http://golang.org/pkg/fmt/",
            "http://golang.org/pkg/os/",
        },
    },
    "http://golang.org/pkg/fmt/": &fakeResult{
        "Package fmt",
        []string{
            "http://golang.org/",
            "http://golang.org/pkg/",
        },
    },
    "http://golang.org/pkg/os/": &fakeResult{
        "Package os",
        []string{
            "http://golang.org/",
            "http://golang.org/pkg/",
        },
    },
}
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Putting a default statement in your select changes the way select works. Without a default statement select will block waiting for any messages on the channels. With a default statement select will run the default statement every time there is nothing to read from the channels. In your code I think this makes an infinite loop. Putting the fmt.Print statement in is allowing the scheduler to schedule other goroutines.

If you change your code like this then it works properly, using select in a non blocking way which allows the other goroutines to run properly.

    for {
        select {
        case todo := <-toDoList:
            if todo.depth > 0 && !visited[todo.url] {
                crawling++
                visited[todo.url] = true
                go crawl(todo, fetcher, toDoList, doneCrawling)
            }
        case <-doneCrawling:
            crawling--
        }
        if crawling == 0 {
            break
        }
    }

You can make your original code work if you use GOMAXPROCS=2 which is another hint that the scheduler is busy in an infinite loop.

Note that goroutines are co-operatively scheduled. What I don't fully understand about your problem is that select is a point where the goroutine should yield - I hope someone else can explain why it isn't in your example.

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1  
select doesn't yield because of the default statement. Though I'm not sure if that's what you don't fully understand, because you nailed the "default" and GOMAXPROCS explanations. –  PuerkitoBio Sep 27 '12 at 12:11
    
That is exactly what I didn't know, thanks! –  Nick Craig-Wood Sep 27 '12 at 12:46
    
"select doesn't yield because of the default statement." is what I don't know. Thanks. –  Sungam Nov 20 '12 at 1:13
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You have 100% CPU load because almost all times the default case will be executed, resulting effectively in an infinite loop because it's executed over and over again. In this situation the Go scheduler does not hand control to another goroutine, by design. So any other goroutine will never have the opportunity to set crawling != 0 and you have your infinite loop.

In my opinion you should remove the default case and instead create another channel if you want to play with the select statement.

Otherwise the runtime package helps you to go the dirty way:

  • runtime.GOMAXPROCS(2) will work (or export GOMAXPROCS=2), this way you will have more than one OS thread of execution
  • call runtime.Gosched() inside Crawl from time to time. Eventhough CPU load is 100%, this will explicitely pass control to another Goroutine.

Edit: Yes, and the reason why fmt.Printf makes a difference: because it explicitely passes control to some syscall stuff... ;)

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"In this situation the Go scheduler does not hand control to another goroutine, by design." Not entirely true. The Go 1.0 (?) scheduler does this, but it is an imperfect scheduler. The workarounds you listed (or doing a syscall by calling fmt.Println()) will wake up the scheduler. See golang.org/doc/go1.2#preemption for details on these improvements in Go 1.2. –  ayke Mar 16 at 23:34
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