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For experimental and learning purposes. I was trying to create a sorting algorithm from a hash function that gives a value biased on alphabetical sequence of the string, it then would ideally place it in the right place from that hash. i tryed looking for a hash-biased sorting function but only found one for integers and would be a memory hog if adapted for my purposes.

The reasoning is that theoretically if done right this algorithm can achieve O(n) speeds or nearly so.

So here is what i have worked out in python so far:

letters = {'a':0,'b':1,'c':2,'d':3,'e':4,'f':5,'g':6,'h':7,'i':8,'j':9,
'k':10,'l':11,'m':12,'n':13,'o':14,'p':15,'q':16,'r':17,
's':18,'t':19,'u':20,'v':21,'w':22,'x':23,'y':24,'z':25,
'A':0,'B':1,'C':2,'D':3,'E':4,'F':5,'G':6,'H':7,'I':8,'J':9,
'K':10,'L':11,'M':12,'N':13,'O':14,'P':15,'Q':16,'R':17,
'S':18,'T':19,'U':20,'V':21,'W':22,'X':23,'Y':24,'Z':25}    

def sortlist(listToSort):
    listLen = len(listToSort)
    newlist = []
    for i in listToSort:
        k = letters[i[0]]
        for j in i[1:]:
            k = (k*26) + letters[j]
        norm = k/pow(26,len(i)) # get a float hash that is normalized(i think thats what     it is called)

        # 2nd part
        idx = int(norm*len(newlist)) # get a general of where it should go
        if newlist: #find the right place from idx
            if norm < newlist[idx][1]:
                while norm < newlist[idx][1] and idx > 0: idx -= 1
                if norm > newlist[idx][1]: idx += 1
            else:
                while norm > newlist[idx][1] and idx < (len(newlist)-1): idx += 1
                if norm > newlist[idx][1]: idx += 1
        newlist.insert(idx,[i,norm])# put it in the right place with the "norm" to ref     later when sorting
    return newlist

i think that the 1st part is good, but the 2nd part needs help. so the Qs would be what would be the best way to do something like this or is it even possible to get O(n) time (or near that) out of this?

the testing i did with an 88,000 word list took prob about 5 min, 10,000 took about 30 sec it got a lot worse as the list count went up.

if this idea actually works out then i would recode it in C to get some real speed and optimizations.

The 2nd part is there only because it works - even if slow, and i cant think of a better way to do it for the life of me, i would like to replace it with something that would not have to do the other loops if at all possible.

thank for any advice or ideas that you could give.

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1  
The right place for this is codereview.stackexchange.com –  user647772 Sep 27 '12 at 7:23
6  
You cannot sort generally in O(n) for all inputs, period. It is simply, fundamentally, mathematically impossible. Basically, the reasoning is this: to sort, you have to distinguish among the n! possible orderings of the input; to do so, you have to get log2(n!) bits of data; to do that, you need to do log2(n!) comparisons, which is O(n log n). –  nneonneo Sep 27 '12 at 7:27
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Of note: special-purpose sorts exist that sort in O(n), but only on certain constrained inputs (e.g. integers of a fixed bit length). Don't confuse that with general-purpose sort, which is what you're (apparently) attempting. –  nneonneo Sep 27 '12 at 7:29
    
Also of note: the timsort algorithm that Python uses is actually really good. It's quite carefully engineered to work well on "practical" datasets containing runs of sorted data. Of course, implementing a sorting algorithm is a nice exercise, but I do want to make you aware that you cannot do it with the time complexity you are hoping for. –  nneonneo Sep 27 '12 at 7:31
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@nneonneo I think that's the clearest and shortest I've ever seen an (informal) proof of a non-obvious theorem. Bravo! –  Nick Johnson Oct 4 '12 at 10:01
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1 Answer 1

On sorting in O(n): you can't do it generally for all inputs, period. It is simply, fundamentally, mathematically impossible.

Here's the nice, short information-theoretic proof of impossibility: to sort, you have to be able to distinguish among the n! possible orderings of the input; to do so, you have to get log2(n!) bits of data; to do that, you need to do O(log (n!)) comparisons, which is O(n log n). Any sorting algorithm that claims to run in O(n) is either running on specialized data (e.g. data with a fixed number of bits), or is not correct.

Implementing a sorting algorithm is a good learning exercise, but you may want to stick to existing algorithms until you are comfortable with the concepts and methods commonly employed. It might be rather frustrating otherwise if the algorithm doesn't work.

Have fun learning!

P.S. Python's built-in timsort algorithm is really good on a lot of real-world data. So, if you need a general sorting algorithm for production code, you can usually rely on .sort/sorted to be fast enough for your needs. (And, if you can understand timsort, you'll do better than 90% of the Python-wielding population :)

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The lower bound of Ω(n log n) stands only for comparison based algorithms in term of comparison operations, assuming all operations are in O(1). For algorithms not based on comparisons, like radix sort or counting sort, the lower bound of Ω(n log n) in term of comparisons operations is not applicable. So any sorting algorithm based on comparisons that claims to have a lower bound less than Ω(n log n) is not correct. –  Kwariz Sep 27 '12 at 11:21
    
@nneonneo,@Kwariz - thanks for your answers, i looked at the radix sort (as mentioned) and concluded that algorithm that i wrote (or tried to) is basically a shoddy implementation of the radix sort with a slightly different concept - using one pass (and one bucket) instead of the radix one of no. of passes as no. letters and using a normalized number biased on the string to sort the string with. –  Scott C Sep 27 '12 at 19:44
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