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In version 3 of Express some features were removed:

the concept of a "layout" (template engine specific now)
partial() (template engine specific)

Changelog: https://github.com/visionmedia/express/wiki/Migrating-from-2.x-to-3.x

The partial() can be changed for EJS own feature called include, but what is the alternative for layouts?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It seems that from Express 3, layout feature is delegated to the responsibility of template engines. You can use ejs-locals (https://github.com/RandomEtc/ejs-locals) for layout.

Install ejs-locals

npm install ejs-locals --save

Use ejs-locals as your app engine in app.js

var express = require('express');
var engine = require('ejs-locals');
...

app.engine('ejs', engine);
app.set('view engine', 'ejs');

Now you can use layout

layout.ejs
<body>
  <%- body %>
</body>

index.ejs
<% layout('layout') -%>

<div class="container">
<div class="jumbotron">
...

Another option is to use express-partials (https://github.com/publicclass/express-partials). The two do the same thing, so it's just your choice.

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For the project in question I used express-partials github.com/publicclass/express-partials, but it seems ejs-locals provides almost the same functionality. –  artvolk Dec 9 '13 at 10:08
    
I came to Node.js recently and had the same question in mind. Yes, the two do the same thing. Thanks for marking it as answer. I'm honoured! –  Andy Dec 9 '13 at 13:21
5  
ejs-locals is unmaintained anymore, unfortunately. –  ddh Jan 17 '14 at 9:29

I struggled with this as well. So I put up a github project with an example for ejs and dustjs.

https://github.com/chovy/express-template-demo

I'm not sure the difference between a partial and an include, you don't need to explicitly pass data to an include. Not sure why you would want a partial.

But for a layout, you just specify a block like this:

//layout.ejs
<html>
<%- body %>
</html>

//page1.ejs
<% layout('layout') -%>
This is loaded from page 1 and overrides <%- body %> in the layout.ejs.

If anyone wants to add more examples, just submit a pull request.

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1  
Thanks, I'll look into this. And about partial vs include: it seems that partial was Express feature (removed in 3.0) and include is EJS mechanism. To me partial has one benefit -- it was possible to pass object to it and not expose all data passed to the view. By the way you can use it because you have ejs-locals in your package.json. –  artvolk Sep 27 '12 at 8:30
2  
And it seems that support from layout() comes from ejs-locals that you use not the EJS itself. –  artvolk Sep 27 '12 at 8:32
    
Yes ejs-locals will give you layouts. –  chovy Sep 30 '12 at 9:20

You can mimic the EJS layouts in Express 2.x with the "include" option. See my answer here:

http://stackoverflow.com/a/12477536/446681

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include is different than a layout. –  chovy Sep 27 '12 at 18:45
    
@chovy - Agreed. But for basic simple purposes you can get by with includes, like you used with layout. –  Hector Correa Sep 27 '12 at 19:23
1  
This is basically like server-side include back in the day, I do NOT recommend going this route. –  chovy Sep 30 '12 at 9:20

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