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I'm studying the FileLock class. What I want to do is start three Threads that will run at the same time and access a single file. While the file is locked by one thread, I want the other two threads to wait for their turn when the lock is released. However, when I run my code below, the threads don't even start all at the same time--they are started one after the other, as soon as each of their run() methods is finished. I don't understand.

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Main m = new Main();
        SomeThread t1 = m.new SomeThread("t1");
        SomeThread t2 = m.new SomeThread("t2");
        SomeThread t3 = m.new SomeThread("t3");
        t1.run();
        t3.run();
        t2.run();
    }

    class SomeThread implements Runnable {
        String name;

        public SomeThread(String s) {
            name = s;
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            System.out.println(name + " started!");
            OtherClass.access(name);
        }
    }

    static class OtherClass {
        static File file = new File("testfile.txt");

        public static void access(String name) {
            FileChannel channel = null;
            FileLock lock = null;
            try {
                channel = new RandomAccessFile(file, "rw").getChannel();
                lock = channel.lock();
                System.out.println("locked by " + name);
                Thread.sleep(3000);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            } finally {
                if (lock != null) {
                    try {
                        lock.release();
                        System.out.println("released by " + name);
                    } catch (IOException e) {
                        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                }
                if (channel != null) {
                    try {
                        channel.close();
                    } catch (IOException e) {
                        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

How can I achieve the scenario I'm trying to get at? And why aren't they starting at the same time? I thought the lock() method only makes the other threads accessing the same file wait until the lock is released.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Threads are started with Thread.start, not Thread.run. run will just call the run method sequentially on the main thread.

You're not even creating threads actually:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Main m = new Main();
    Thread t1 = new Thread(m.new SomeThread("t1"));
    Thread t2 = new Thread(m.new SomeThread("t2"));
    Thread t3 = new Thread(m.new SomeThread("t3"));
    t1.start();
    t2.start();
    t3.start();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, you mean passing the Runnable inside a Thread object! –  Matt Sep 27 '12 at 8:27
    
@mattquiros: I've updated with a code snippet. –  Tudor Sep 27 '12 at 8:27
    
Just for the record, this is going to generate an OverlappingFileLockException. –  Matt Sep 27 '12 at 8:30
    
@mattquiros: This means there is also a problem with OtherClass I guess, but now at least you have concurrent threads. –  Tudor Sep 27 '12 at 8:31
2  
@mattquiros: The docs of FileLock say: File locks are held on behalf of the entire Java virtual machine. They are not suitable for controlling access to a file by multiple threads within the same virtual machine. Why don't you just use a normal lock instead? –  Tudor Sep 27 '12 at 8:37

Forget it. It won't work. File locks are held on behalf of the entire process, not individual threads.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess he could just use a normal lock instead. –  Tudor Sep 27 '12 at 8:38
    
Interesting. Now I don't know how to make AsyncTasks reading and writing to the same file coordinate in Android. –  Matt Sep 27 '12 at 8:41
    
@Tudor What's a normal lock? Something I have to write on my own? –  Matt Sep 27 '12 at 8:45
    
@mattquiros: All you need is the ReentrantLock class: docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/locks/… –  Tudor Sep 27 '12 at 8:51
    
@mattquiros It shouldn't be that interesting, or that much of a surprise. It is stated in the Javadoc in almost exactly those terms. –  EJP Sep 27 '12 at 9:58

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