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Classes ShinyCoinProvider and RustyCoinProvider both implement Provider<Coin> and each produces a Coin object with slightly different properties.

Another set of two client classes RichPlayer and PoorPlayer need an instance of Coin injected by Guice library automatically.

Now Guice is required to use ShinyCoinProvider in Richplayer and RustyCoinProvider in PoorPlayer classes.

hence simple, bind().toProvider() won't be sufficient here.

How to bind different providers to different client classes explicitly, where the provided Object is of same type ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

try this:

bind(Coin.class).annotatedWith(Names.named("richplayer")).toProvider(ShinyCoinProvider.class)

and annotation Coin field in Richplayer with @Named("richplayer") like this:

@Inject
@Named("richplayer")
private Coin coin;
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Thanks. I was confused that @Named is only used to identify Classes when they are defined. Will try this solution. –  S.D. Sep 27 '12 at 8:34

turtledove's answer is called annotated bindings and makes a lot of sense if you have control of your RichPlayer and PoorPlayer. It also enables you to request shiny coins and rusty coins from the same class. However, if you wanted, you could also use private modules.

class CoinModule extends AbstractModule {
  @Override public void configure() {
    install(new PrivateModule() {
      @Override public void configure() {
        bind(Coin.class).toProvider(ShinyCoinProvider.class);
        bind(RichPlayer.class);
        expose(RichPlayer.class);
      }
    });
    install(new PrivateModule() {
      @Override public void configure() {
        bind(Coin.class).toProvider(RustyCoinProvider.class);
        bind(PoorPlayer.class);
        expose(PoorPlayer.class);
      }
    });
  }
}

Basically, this installs two anonymous inner modules that each binds a different player, so that even without annotations, RichPlayer and any dependencies of RichPlayer, and any dependencies of its dependencies, etc will all use ShinyCoinProvider. Likewise with PoorPlayer and RustyCoinProvider. This might be a little harder to follow than the annotated bindings, but is also a little more powerful--perhaps from here you can reduce RichPlayer and PoorPlayer to use the same concrete class, or create a CoinPurse class that both player implementations use, which simply injects Provider<Coin>.

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