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I am always confused between those two operators, I don't know what makes the number lower or larger.

Someone can tell me how to remember what each of those operators does? (Signs, some examples and etc.)

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Could someone point out if endianness matters in this case? I mean, is LittleEndian << equals BigEndian >>? And what about MiddleEndian? –  elmigranto Oct 17 '12 at 11:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Think of them as arrows that 'push' bits up or down the number.

The << operator will increase the size of the number by pushing bits up towards the higher value slots in a byte, for example:

128  64  32  16  8   4   2   1
-------------------------------
 0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0    before push (value = 4)
 0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0    after << push (value = 8)

The >> operator will decrease the size of the number by pushing bits down towards the lower value slots in a byte, for example:

128  64  32  16  8   4   2   1
-------------------------------
 0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0    before push (value = 4)
 0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0    after >> push (value = 2)
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You should include the statements for operations too. What I mean is, one can easily get confused between 2 << 4 and 4 >> 2. No? –  Prasanth Sep 27 '12 at 8:37

You can't really think of them as making numbers larger or smaller. Both kinds of shifts can make numbers larger or smaller, depending on the inputs.

  • left shift (unsigned interpretation): a 0-bit can fall off the left side, making the number bigger, or a 1-bit can fall off the left side, making the number smaller.
  • left shift (signed interpretation): a 0-bit can be shifted into the sign that was previously 0, making the number bigger; a 0-bit can be shifted into the sign that was previously 1, making the number much bigger; a 1-bit can be shifted into the sign that was previously 1, making the number smaller; a 1-bit can be shifted into the sign that was previously 0, making the number much smaller.
  • unsigned right shift: ok this one is simple, the number gets smaller.
  • signed right shift: negative numbers get bigger, positive numbers get smaller.

The reason I wrote "interpretation" for left shifts but not for right shifts is that there is only one kind of left shift, but depending on whether you interpret the result as signed or unsigned, it has a "different" result (the bits are the same, of course). But there are really two different kinds of right shift, one keeps the sign and the unsigned right shift just shifts in a 0-bit (that also has a signed interpretation, but it's usually not important).

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Shifts work in binary in the same direction as they do in decimal. Shifting left (1, 10, 100, ...) makes the number larger. Shifting right makes the number smaller.

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<< is the left shift operator. For instance 0b10 << 2 = 0b1000 (made up 0b syntax). >> is the right shift operator, it's the opposite. 0b10 >> 1 = 0b1. The sign will not change for signed numbers right shifts. For signed left shifts you have to understand 2's complement to understand what's going on.

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<< --- it tells going left direction and this means left side decreasing.

>> --- it tells going right direction and this means right side decreasing.
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