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I have a function when has an if-else statement. It essentially looks like this:

if(boolean == true)
{
    // do something
    boolean = false;
}

else if(boolean == false)
{
    // do the other thing
    boolean = true;
}

Now, my understanding is that the if statement will exit and return control to the function and then continue according to the changed boolean value. But I'm clearly missing something because my code is not exiting the original 'if'/'else if' statement (whichever the original case). Can anyone tell me what I've missed?

Well as requested, additional data about the code is that it is a part of my android project and each condition in the if-else block has a nested function and the boolean(global) value is being set/unset withing these functions. So the code now looks like this:

dummyFunction(){

boolean = checkIfTrueOrFalse();

if (boolean) {

onClick( public void onClick(){

     // do something

boolean = false;}

} else if(boolean == false){

   onClick( public void onClick(){

     // do something

boolean = true;}

}
}

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
It surely will exit, the question may rather be at which point will it exit? –  ron Sep 27 '12 at 8:56
3  
What is happening instead? Can you provide an example which compiles and we can run to see the problem? –  Peter Lawrey Sep 27 '12 at 8:56
5  
Side note: if (b == true) is ugly. Simply use if (b). Similarly, if (b == false) is ugly. Simply use if (!b) –  JB Nizet Sep 27 '12 at 8:58
    
In an if else construction, there will always be one path chosen. Either the if case or the else case. Not both or none! If you want to understand better, try inserting some System.out.println(...). –  f_puras Sep 27 '12 at 9:01
    
How are you expecting the program to flow? –  Azodious Sep 27 '12 at 9:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
if(boolean == true)
{
    // do something
    boolean = false;
}

if (boolean == false)
{
    // do the other thing
    boolean = true;
}

When you do this, then the program will flow to the second condition. In an if/else if statement, if the if statement has been satisfied, then the program will ignore the else if block.

Your current code simply flows through the first if block and then skips the else if statement to end the block.

share|improve this answer
    
Please take a look at the information I've added to my original question. The situation will hopefully get clearer. –  Rameez Hussain Sep 27 '12 at 9:25
    
Thanks I took your advice and changed the else if to if and it worked better. :) –  Rameez Hussain Sep 27 '12 at 9:43
void someMethod()
{
    boolean aBoolean = true;
    if(aBoolean == true) 
    {     
        // do something     
        aBoolean = false; 
    }  
    else if(aBoolean == false) 
    {     
        // do the other thing     
        aBoolean = true; 
    }
}

When someMethod will execute, since aBoolean is assigned with true, control will come to if block cause the condition becomes true. if it was false, then the control will come to else part.

share|improve this answer
    
@Azodious.. Why not just use if(aBoolean)?? And we really don't need an else-if.. Just else will do.. –  Rohit Jain Sep 27 '12 at 9:05
    
Yes, but the purpoose was to make OP understand the concept of if-else flow. –  Azodious Sep 27 '12 at 9:14
    
@Azodious.. Yeah I know.. I am not offending the solution in any way.. Just wanted to quote it to you.. –  Rohit Jain Sep 27 '12 at 9:24

Could you provide more info regarding your code not exiting either of the 2 blocks? Doing System.out.println() of variables within your blocks might be able to help you determine why your code is not exiting.

You could use an if/else pair instead of an if/else-if as the parameter that your code depends on is would be either true/false. If the if-block is not satisfied, automatically the else-block would be traversed.

share|improve this answer
    
I've added information to my original question. Please take a look. –  Rameez Hussain Sep 27 '12 at 9:22
    
I just noticed, you used boolean as an identifier/variable, and the Java tag is included in your original post. If indeed your code is for Java, boolean is considered a reserved word as it is a primitive data type, thus should not be used as an identifier in Java programs.You might want to consider using a different identifier aside from boolean. –  ebcagadas Sep 27 '12 at 20:17
    
I know that. :) I'm actually using a different variable name in my actual program. This was just conceptual. I didn't mean for you to take it literally. :) –  Rameez Hussain Sep 28 '12 at 8:32

Your code is actually a shortcut for

if (boolean) {
    // do something
    boolean = false;

} else {

    if (!boolean) {
        // do the other thing
        boolean = true;
    }
}

Written this way, it maybe becomes clearer that the inner if nested in the else case will not be processed if the first if condition was already met.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why you need that inner-if at all?? –  Rohit Jain Sep 27 '12 at 9:10
    
You're right, it is redundant. Yet the OP's code contained it, and IMHO his question focussed on the if/else construct. –  f_puras Sep 27 '12 at 9:13

Well I've solved it (taking inputs from here of course). I just added a call to the function within the nested functions and it worked. Now the code looks like this:

public static void dummyFunction(){

boolean = checkIfTrueOrFalse();

if (boolean) {

onClick( public void onClick(){

 // do something
 dummyFunction();

boolean = false;}

} else if(boolean == false){

   onClick( public void onClick(){

 // do something

dummyFunction();

boolean = true;}

}
}
share|improve this answer
    
All right. But please remove the if(boolean == false), it's superfluous. Just } else { will do and is much clearer. –  f_puras Sep 27 '12 at 10:49
    
Will do. Thanks. :) –  Rameez Hussain Sep 27 '12 at 14:10

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