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I have a function writen in C++ with the next header:

void EncodeFromBufferIN(void* bufferIN,int bufferINSize, unsigned char*  &bufferOUT, int &bufferOUTSize);

I've edited the .h and .cpp files like this, to be able calling the function by importing the DLL in C#:

**EncodeFromBufferIN.h**
extern "C" {
     __declspec(dllexport) void EncodeFromBufferIN(void* bufferIN, int bufferINSize, unsigned char*  &bufferOUT, int &bufferOUTSize);
}
**EncodeFromBufferIN.cpp**
extern void EncodeFromBufferIN(void* bufferIN, int bufferINSize, unsigned char*  &bufferOUT, int &bufferOUTSize){
    // stuff to be done
}

But now my problem is that I don't know how to call the function in C#. I've added the next code in C# but not sure how to pass the parameters to the function.

[DllImport("QASEncoder.dll")]
        unsafe public static extern void EncodeFromBufferIN(void* bufferIN, int bufferINSize, out char[] bufferOUT, out int bufferOUTSize);

The bufferIN and bufferOUT should be strings but if I'm calling the function like this:

public string prepareJointsForQAS()
{
   string bufferIN = "0 0 0 0 0";
   char[] bufferOUT;
   int bufferOUTSize;
   EncodeFromBufferIN(bufferIN, bufferIN.Length, bufferOUT, bufferOUTSize);
}

I get this error: "The best overloaded method matrch for ... has some invalid arguments". So how should the parameters be passed?

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I don't see how your call would work. What allocates the memory for the output buffer? What frees it? –  David Schwartz Sep 27 '12 at 10:03
1  
I saw unsigned char* &bufferOUT. Do you change char pointer in your cpp code? Also your pinvoke method for the function is invalid. You have to use some kind of "out string bufferIn" but check out marshaling attributes for you case in MSDN documentation. –  MaxFX Sep 27 '12 at 10:09
    
@David That's the problem, I don't know how to call the function and how should the parameters look in C# to match the ones from C++ –  Hubrus Sep 27 '12 at 11:16
    
@MaxFX No, the pointers are not changing –  Hubrus Sep 27 '12 at 11:19
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Marshalling works best with C Style calls. So it is best to use pure C on your public interface. If it is at all feasible to change the native code to

void EncodeFromBufferIN(
    unsigned char* bufferIN, 
    int bufferINSize, 
    unsigned char* bufferOUT,     
    int* bufferOUTSize);

Then the call in C# can be thus

[DllImport("QASEncoder.dll")]
public static extern void EncodeFromBufferIN(
    String bufferIN, 
    int bufferINSize, 
    StringBuilder bufferOUT, 
    ref int bufferOUTSize);

String inStr = new String(255);
int inSize = 255;
// make an educated estimate for the output size 
// and preallocate in C# (I am guessing 255)
StringBuilder outStr = new StringBuilder(255);
int outSize = 255;

EncodeFromBufferIN(inStr, inSize, outStr, outSize);

This way you can avoid memory allocations in unmanaged code which (although feasible) can get messy.

Hope this gets you going.

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This seems to be easy and legit ... thanks a lot! –  Hubrus Sep 27 '12 at 13:05
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A few corrections that worked for me:

        string inStr = "Value to pass";
        int inSize = inStr.Length;
        StringBuilder outStr = new StringBuilder(255);
        int outSize = 255;

        EncodeFromBufferIN(inStr, inSize, outStr, ref outSize);

regards.

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