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What does it do, in Python 3.0? There's no documentation on the official Python website and help("nonlocal") does not work, either.

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3  
Take a look at this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1414304/local-functions-in-python –  Matt Joiner Dec 5 '10 at 13:50
4  
Here is the official Python website documentation for nonlocal: docs.python.org/3/reference/… (this documentation has been available since Python 3.0, so the OP's assertion that there is no official documentation was just wrong) –  wkschwartz Oct 3 '13 at 17:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 68 down vote accepted

Compare this, without using nonlocal:

>>> def outer():
       x = 1
       def inner():
           x = 2
           print("inner:", x)
       inner()
       print("outer:", x)


>>> outer()
inner: 2
outer: 1

To this, using nonlocal:

>>> def outer():
       x = 1
       def inner():
           nonlocal x
           x = 2
           print("inner:", x)
       inner()
       print("outer:", x)


>>> outer()
inner: 2
outer: 2
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14  
How is that different than global x? –  ooboo Aug 11 '09 at 18:02
16  
Its very similar - but note that the outer x is not global in the example but is instead defined in the outer function. –  Anon Aug 11 '09 at 18:04
    
so it lets you do inner classes that reference outer vars, like java? –  Dustin Getz Aug 11 '09 at 18:07
    
@Dustin - Actually, if you had class A with an attribute x and a subclass B defined in it, you would refer to x from within B as A.x –  Anon Aug 11 '09 at 18:37
    
(x and B both defined in A) –  Anon Aug 11 '09 at 18:38

In short, it lets you assign values to a variable in an outer (but non-global) scope. See PEP 3104 for all the gory details.

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A google search for "python nonlocal" turned up the Proposal, PEP 3104, which fully describes the syntax and reasoning behind the statement. in short, it works in exactly the same way as the global statement, except that it is used to refer to variables that are neither global nor local to the function.

Here's a brief example of what you can do with this. The counter generator can be rewritten to use this so that it looks more like the idioms of languages with closures.

def make_counter():
    count = 0
    def counter():
        nonlocal count
        count += 1
        return count
    return counter

Obviously, you could write this as a generator, like:

def counter_generator():
    count = 0
    while True:
        count += 1
        yield count

But while this is perfectly idiomatic python, it seems that the first version would be a bit more obvious for beginners. Properly using generators, by calling the returned function, is a common point of confusion. The first version explicitly returns a function.

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1  
I was sure that's what the keyword 'global' does - works up higher enviornments until it reaches a variable with that name. a variable x could be declared at module level, inside a class, then separately in a function inside this class and then in an inner function of that function - how does it know which x to refer to? –  ooboo Aug 11 '09 at 17:54
3  
the thing about global is that it only works for global variables. it cannot see variables in an enclosing, nonglobal scope. –  IfLoop Oct 11 '09 at 3:53
    
I tried the make_counter - however it doesn't return a generator but a function. is there a way to return a generator so later i could iterate over it? –  Dejel Dec 5 '13 at 17:23
    
@Dejel: this example is intended to illustrate the nonlocal statement in Python; If you want a sequence of natural numbers, the python idiom is actually itertools.count() –  IfLoop Dec 5 '13 at 17:28
    
I would like to demo the ability to return a generator like with yield - yield actually returns a generator. My idea is not to use yield and instead maybe use nonlocal or another solution –  Dejel Dec 5 '13 at 17:40

@ooboo:

It takes the one "closest" to the point of reference in the source code. This is called "Lexical Scoping" and is standard for >40 years now.

Python's class members are really in a dictionary called __dict__ and will never be reached by lexical scoping.

If you don't specify nonlocal but do x = 7, it will create a new local variable "x". If you do specify nonlocal, it will find the "closest" "x" and assign to that. If you specify nonlocal and there is no "x", it will give you an error message.

The keyword global has always seemed strange to me since it will happily ignore all the other "x" except for the outermost one. Weird.

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help('nonlocal') The nonlocal statement


    nonlocal_stmt ::= "nonlocal" identifier ("," identifier)*

The nonlocal statement causes the listed identifiers to refer to previously bound variables in the nearest enclosing scope. This is important because the default behavior for binding is to search the local namespace first. The statement allows encapsulated code to rebind variables outside of the local scope besides the global (module) scope.

Names listed in a nonlocal statement, unlike to those listed in a global statement, must refer to pre-existing bindings in an enclosing scope (the scope in which a new binding should be created cannot be determined unambiguously).

Names listed in a nonlocal statement must not collide with pre- existing bindings in the local scope.

See also:

PEP 3104 - Access to Names in Outer Scopes
The specification for the nonlocal statement.

Related help topics: global, NAMESPACES

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1  
Learn something new every day. I had no idea you could use help() on keywords (and now my mind is blown: help() with no arguments goes interactive). –  Erik Youngren Feb 24 '14 at 9:05

My personal understanding of the "nonlocal" statement (and do excuse me as I am new to Python and Programming in general) is that the "nonlocal" is a way to use the Global functionality within iterated functions rather than the body of the code itself. A Global statement between functions if you will.

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