Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a simple HTML/CSS task. I have a page with two images of the same size displayed in a row. See this page. I need to adjust displayed size of the images to meet all of these criteria:

  1. Images must be fully visible together in the browser's window, i.e. size of containig div/table is limitied to the size of client area
  2. Images are not enlarged, aspect ratio is preserved
  3. Images are centered horizontally with constant space between them
  4. Works at least in IE9, Chrome and Safari

I'm not very experienced in CSS, so I can beat up at most 2 criterion of 4.

The sample page I'm currently using satisfy 3, 4 and partially 1 (only width is restricted). I leaved sample as close to my problem as possible, leaving in all related master CSS files and automatically generated ASP.NET containters.

Images should remain in input tag, not in img, it's desirable, though not crucial. Would you please suggest a proper combinatoin of style attributes satisfying all the conditions?

Update:

Solution with relaxed criterion 1, where images are allowed to have height more than client area's height, would be appreciated too.

share|improve this question
    
is it required that you keep using a table to contain images? –  Giona Sep 27 '12 at 11:34
    
@GionaF No. I just thought it would come in handy. –  Mikhail Sep 27 '12 at 11:35
    
I've created chat room for this question: chat.stackoverflow.com/rooms/17237/… –  Mikhail Sep 27 '12 at 12:23
    
Sorry, i've tried but i can't either preserve the ratio or fit in the height ;-) –  Giona Sep 27 '12 at 12:39
    
@GionaF Even more, I bet you didn't check it in more than one browser :) –  Mikhail Sep 27 '12 at 12:55

2 Answers 2

Got it, but i used images as background instead of <img>. Hope it's not an issue.

With background-size:contain; the background image is scaled, while preserving the image’s original proportions / aspect ratio. It is supported by FF4+, IE9+, Chrome1+ (with vendor prefix), Opera10+ and Safari 3+ (source).


The main problem with your first requirement: "size of containig div/table is limitied to the size of client area", is that you can't set height:100%; unless the parent container has an height set too.

In your page i see that you've an header and a footer with dynamic height, so you'll need some jQuery to adjust the container's height. But let's first see how to do it with just CSS, then we'll add an header and footer.


Demo (try to resize the window)

HTML:

<html>
<body>
<div id="body">
    <div>
        <div class="left"></div>
    </div>
    <div>
        <div class="right"></div>
    </div>
</div>
</body>
</html>​

CSS:

html, body, #body {
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
}
#body, #body > div {
    overflow:hidden;
}
#body > div {
    box-sizing:border-box;
    width:50%;
    height:100%;
    float:left;
    padding:10px; /* or whatever you need */
}
#body > div > div {
    margin:0 auto;
    height:100%;
    width:100%;
    background-repeat:no-repeat;
    background-position:top center;
    -webkit-background-size:contain; /* Chrome1+, Safari 3+ */
    background-size:contain; /* FF4+, IE9+, Chrome3+, Opera10+, Safari 3+ */
}
#body > div > div.left {
    background-image:url(/* your left image url */);
    max-width:417px; /* the real image width */
    max-height:512px;; /* the real image height */
}
#body > div > div.right {
    background-image:url(/* your right image url */);
    max-width:417px; /* the real image width */
    max-height:512px;; /* the real image height */
}​

Let's add the header and footer. We have to remove height:100%; from #body, and calculate its height as a result of: window height - header height - footer height.

Demo (resize the window)

HTML:

<html>
<body>
<header>I'm a header</header>
<div id="body">
    <div>
        <div class="left"></div>
    </div>
    <div>
        <div class="right"></div>
    </div>
</div>
<footer>I'm a footer</footer>
</body>
</html>​

CSS:

html, body {
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
}
header, footer {
    background:grey;
}
#body {
    height:400px; /* fallback no javascript */
}
#body, #body > div {
    overflow:hidden;
}
#body > div {
    box-sizing:border-box;
    width:50%;
    height:100%;
    float:left;
    padding:10px; /* or whatever you need */
}
#body > div > div {
    margin:0 auto;
    height:100%;
    width:100%;
    background-repeat:no-repeat;
    background-position:top center;
    -webkit-background-size:contain; /* Chrome1+, Safari 3+ */
    background-size:contain; /* FF4+, IE9+, Chrome3+, Opera10+, Safari 3+ */
}
#body > div > div.left {
    background-image:url(/* your left image url */);
    max-width:417px; /* the real image width */
    max-height:512px;; /* the real image height */
}
#body > div > div.right {
    background-image:url(/* your right image url */);
    max-width:417px; /* the real image width */
    max-height:512px;; /* the real image height */
}​

jQuery:

function calcHeight(){
    var docHeight = $(document).height();
    var headHeight = $('header').outerHeight();
    var footHeight = $('footer').outerHeight();
    var bodyHeight =  docHeight - ( headHeight + footHeight);
    $('#body').height(bodyHeight);
}
calcHeight(); /* called first time on page load */
$(window).on('resize',calcHeight());​/* do the math again when window's resized */

I think it's pretty straight forward. I wrote it this way to make it understandable, but of course you can compress it more.

I've used outerHeight for footer and header to include possible margins.

If you don't want to include the jQuery library, there's surely a pure JavaScript way to obtain the same.

share|improve this answer
    
In your first sample criterion 3 is violated - space between images is not constant. In the second sample image height is ignored and footer is not rendered beneath the images. If possible, I would prefer a less strict solution (see update in the question), but without JavaScript and BG images. –  Mikhail Sep 27 '12 at 14:42
    
@Mikhail it is constant. Well, good luck for the rest, i already know how to do it with your new requirements, but i hate when the "rules" change after i brained for a solution. –  Giona Sep 27 '12 at 14:49
    
It is not constant, when you set small window height. At least in Chrome. Check this screentshot: postimage.org/image/8sxeqfwol –  Mikhail Sep 27 '12 at 14:57
    
@Mikhail What you mean by constant? How can it be constant with images centered horizontally? –  Giona Sep 27 '12 at 14:58
    
Two images with constant space between them represents a block, which is centered horizontally. –  Mikhail Sep 27 '12 at 15:03

In order to maintain the aspect ratio only define width in css, it will automatically adjust the height to maintain the aspect ratio.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but this is not an answer. –  Mikhail Sep 27 '12 at 11:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.