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I'm implementing a class-like structure in jQuery, but I'm having some trouble when I try to call some of my functions.

This is how the structure is setup:

MyClass = function(name) {
    this.init(name);
}
$.extend(MyClass.prototype, {
    init: function(theName) {
        this.myFunction(); // works
        $('.myclass').each(function(){
            this.myFunction(); // doesn't work
        });
    },
    myFunction = function(){}
});

The problem I'm having is that when I try to call one of my functions (e.g., myFunction()) from inside a jQuery block (like the each() construct above), I get the error "myFunction() is not a function."

I think this has something to do with the this keyword changing its meaning inside the jQuery block, but I'm not sure. Any help would be appreciated!

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marked as duplicate by Bergi Aug 6 at 21:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@Bergi so this question is a duplicate of a question that was posted more than 4 years after it? Nice. –  Josh Leitzel Aug 6 at 21:45
    
Yes, that question from 2013 is a canonical reference, explaining the problem that you also had and all (sic!) solutions to it extensively. Please don't feel offended, you've done nothing wrong :-) I'm just directing future readers to the canonical. –  Bergi Aug 6 at 21:52
    
I'm not offended, and I definitely understand! ;) It just sucks that the copy around this feature makes it seem like the OP sloppily asked a question that already had an answer – "This question already has an answer here:" "This question has been asked before and already has an answer." Just a little weird. –  Josh Leitzel Aug 6 at 23:18
    
Yeah, it really should say something like "This question has a better answer here" or so. See also my MSO post –  Bergi Aug 6 at 23:25
    
Ah, very nice. Gave you a +1 over there. –  Josh Leitzel Aug 6 at 23:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to assign this to another variable, because of how scope works.

MyClass = function(name) {
    this.init(name);
}
$.extend(MyClass.prototype, {
    init: function(theName) {
        this.myFunction(); // works
        var that = this;
        $('.myclass').each(function(){
                this.myFunction(); // doesn't work
                that.myFunction(); // should work
        });
    },
    myFunction = function(){}
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! –  Josh Leitzel Aug 11 '09 at 18:29

The .each() function changes the context of this (as does any function in JavaScript).

You need to do something like this:

MyClass = function(name) {
    this.init(name);
}
$.extend(MyClass.prototype, {
    init: function(theName) {
        this.myFunction(); // works
        var myClass = this;
        $('.myclass').each(function(){
                myClass.myFunction(); // doesn't work
        });
    },
    myFunction = function(){}
});
share|improve this answer
1  
You know .. your example says that myClass.myFunction(); doesn't work... –  Tyler Carter Aug 11 '09 at 18:09
MyClass = function(name) {
    this.init(name);
}
$.extend(MyClass.prototype, {
    init: function(theName) {
        this.myFunction(); // works
        temp = this;
        $('.myclass').each(function(){
                temp.myFunction(); // works
        });
    },
    myFunction = function(){}
});

Try that. :)

share|improve this answer
    
You know .. your example says that temp.myFunction(); doesn't work... –  Tyler Carter Aug 11 '09 at 18:08
    
When I copied the OP's code, I forgot to remove the comment. My mistake. –  Salty Aug 12 '09 at 15:39

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