Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am launching a service (process) with the code below. My issue is as follows:

  • I need to read the output of the process to make sure it gets started
  • if it gets started, I return and everything is fine
  • if it does not get started for whatever reason, the while will block forever as the process just hangs without outputting anything

Any ideas how I could exit the method gracefully if I don't get the expected string?

ps: I could do it with a Future and a timeout on get but thought there might be a better way.

public boolean startService() {
    try {
        ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder("service.exe");
        pb.directory(new File("C:/serviceFolder/"));
        pb.redirectErrorStream(true);
        Process p = pb.start();
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream()));
        String line;
        while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
            if (line.toLowerCase().contains("started")) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false; //I never get there when it fails
    } catch (IOException e) {
        throw new RuntimeException("Could not start the service.exe process", e);
    }        
}
share|improve this question
3  
A Future with a timeout is the better way –  Bohemian Sep 27 '12 at 12:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you can modify the service code, it's better to change it not to hang if it can't start - it should exit and log an error message. This way your Java code will work as-is.

If you can't, there is no other way beside setting a timeout, because your Java code has no means to know what's going on.

Of course, if you can modify the service, an alternative is to watch for output other then the process's standard output/error, like a PID file, an error log message, or whatever. If the subprocess already creates a PID file, for example, you can schedule a check on this file instead of the standard input, but really it's the same concept, just applied differently to use nicer/simpler code

share|improve this answer

Something like this should work. Essentially, start the service in a separate thread and create a Timer that interrupts it after a certain period. Note that the timer task is a Daemon so it should not hold up your process if it needs to quit.

Obviously this will not work if reader.readLine() consumes and discards interrupts.

private static class ServiceRunner implements Runnable {
  // Am I running?
  volatile boolean running = true;
  // My thread.
  volatile Thread thread = Thread.currentThread();

  @Override
  public void run() {
    // Start a timer.
    Timer timer = new Timer("Wait for ServiceRunner to finish.", true);
    // Fire it after 2 seconds.
    timer.schedule(new StopTask(), 2000);
    try {
      // Start the service.
      startService();
    } finally {
      // No longer running.
      running = false;
    }
  }

  class StopTask extends TimerTask {

    @Override
    public void run() {
      if (running) {
        // Interrupt the service runner.
        thread.interrupt();
      }
    }
  }

  public boolean startService() {
    try {
      ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder("service.exe");
      pb.directory(new File("C:/serviceFolder/"));
      pb.redirectErrorStream(true);
      Process p = pb.start();
      BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream()));
      String line;
      while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
        if (line.toLowerCase().contains("started")) {
          return true;
        }
      }
      return false; //I never get there when it fails
    } catch (IOException e) {
      throw new RuntimeException("Could not start the service.exe process", e);
    }
  }
}

I have not tested this code but it should work.

You will need to make adjustments to retain whether the service started or not.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but that looks like a reimplementation of future#get with timeout. –  assylias Sep 27 '12 at 14:24
    
Does Future.get abort the operation if the timeout expires? This does. I agree, however, that this could quite easily be implemented with a FutureTask. –  OldCurmudgeon Sep 27 '12 at 14:38
    
On timeout, it will try to interrupt the running task, which in my case will throw an InterruptedException. –  assylias Sep 27 '12 at 14:49

It seems that the Future#get approach is preferred. For future reference, I have modified the code in the following way:

public boolean startService() {

    Callable<Boolean> start = new Callable<Boolean>() {
        @Override
        public Boolean call() throws Exception {
            ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder("service.exe");
            pb.directory(new File("C:/serviceFolder/"));
            pb.redirectErrorStream(true);
            Process p = pb.start();
            BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream()));
            String line;
            while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
                if (line.toLowerCase().contains("started")) {
                    return true;
                }
            }
            return false;
        }
    };

    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
    Future<Boolean> future = executor.submit(start);

    try {
        return future.get(1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
    } catch (InterruptedException ignore) {
        Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
        return false;
    } catch (ExecutionException | TimeoutException e) {
        logger.error("Could not start service", e);
        return false;
    } finally {
        executor.shutdownNow();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.