Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

If I have an object which has other nested objects and properties, like the one below.

var request = new GetInfoRequest
{
   GetInformation = new GetInformationType
   {
      Code = "abc",
      Id = "123",
      Item = new InfoItem
      {
         Itemid = "test",
         ItemName = "testname"
      },
      StartDate = new StartdatumType { Start = new DateTime(1990, 1, 1)},
      EndDate = new EndDateType { End = new DateTime.Now }    
   }
};

When passing this object to a function I want to check that none of its properties or objects are null.

public InfoResponse getInfo(request)
{
  // Check that the request object has no null properties or objects.
}

Is there a simpler way of checking this than stepping through each child object and property with if statements? A recursive method or something similar?

Extending
In my getInfo function I don't want to have to write like this:

if (request != null && request.GetInformation != null && ... etc.)
share|improve this question
2  
Hmm, you can recursively step through each child object and property ... can you elaborate a bit further where you're stuck at? – O. R. Mapper Sep 27 '12 at 12:20
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use reflection and iterate through all the properties to check for null. Here is a snippet to get started

using System.Reflection;

GetInfoRequest objGetInfoRequest;
Type getInfoRequestType = objGetInfoRequest.GetType();
PropertyInfo[] myProps = getInfoRequestType.GetProperties();
share|improve this answer

you could use reflection to iterate through the fields.

you well need some recursion for the nested values.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.