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There is a table event with the attributes start, end, status. There could be following entries:

09:00:00 27.09.2012 10:00:00 27.09.2012 active
10:00:00 27.09.2012 11:00:00 27.09.2012 active
11:00:00 27.09.2012 12:00:00 27.09.2012 active
12:00:00 27.09.2012 13:00:00 27.09.2012 sleeping
13:00:00 27.09.2012 14:00:00 27.09.2012 sleeping
14:00:00 27.09.2012 15:00:00 27.09.2012 active

Now I would like to extract intervals in which the status didn't change. The result of this example would be:

09:00:00 27.09.2012 12:00:00 27.09.2012 active
12:00:00 27.09.2012 14:00:00 27.09.2012 sleeping
14:00:00 27.09.2012 15:00:00 27.09.2012 active

Is there some SQL idiom to create that kind of result? I'm using MySQL, but if you give me some other SQL dialect I can also translate it, as long as it doesn't use some weird vendor features.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming that the time periods don't overlap, you can do this in MySQL with a correlated subquery:

 select min(start) as start, max(end) as end, e.status
 from (select e.*,
             (select min(start)
              from event e2
              where e2.status <> e.status and e2.start > e.start
             ) as nextperiodstart
      from event e
     ) e
 group by status, nextperiodstart
 order by 1

This uses the begining of the next period to identify the group being done.

By the way, I would do this very differently in almost any other database, using ROW_NUMBER, which is an ANSI standard function not supported by MySQL. Be careful what you call a "some weird vendor feature". Most databases deviate from the standard in some way. This is one way that MySQL deviates.

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