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I have my Spring 3.1 app configured like this

<http use-expressions="true" entry-point-ref="http401UnauthorizedEntryPoint">

    <intercept-url pattern="/app/demo" access="hasRole('Demo')" />
    <intercept-url pattern="/app/**" access="isAuthenticated()" />
    <intercept-url pattern="/admin/**" access="hasRole('Admin')" />

    <custom-filter position="PRE_AUTH_FILTER"
        ref="currentWindowsIdentityAuthenticationFilter" />

    <logout invalidate-session="true" delete-cookies="JSESSIONID"
        logout-url="/logout" logout-success-url="/logout-success" />

</http>

I have written a custom preauth filter. When I call my app at the root URL / the filter chain hooks in and runs the preauth filter although this resouce is not protected. This means that the logout does not work as designed. After a logout a login is performed again.

My implementation is based on the org.springframework.security.web.authentication.preauth.AbstractPreAuthenticatedProcessingFilter class.

Is this normal behavior or can this be fixed some how? I'd like the auth be performed on the protected URLs only.

As I side note, I do not intend to configure security='none' because I want to maintain the security context on all pages.

I have posted the appropriate log out on pastebin. It is too verbose to include in here.

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Can you turn debug on (add line log4j.logger.org.springframework.security=DEBUG to log4j.properties) and post output here in your question? –  Xaerxess Sep 27 '12 at 14:09
    
See edit above. –  Michael-O Sep 27 '12 at 14:37
    
So the problem is: After a logout a login is performed again.? –  Xaerxess Sep 27 '12 at 14:49
    
And second question: should other resources like /other be run through PRE_AUTH_FILTER? –  Xaerxess Sep 27 '12 at 14:59
    
First question: Yes, because the filter is perform on /**. Second question: No, only those defined by intercept-url. As far as I know, the http matches on / and applies the entire chain on it. –  Michael-O Sep 27 '12 at 15:03

2 Answers 2

Seems that what you want is creating special <http> without any filters for logout URL:

<http pattern="/logout/**" security="none" />

<http use-expressions="true" entry-point-ref="http401UnauthorizedEntryPoint">

    <intercept-url pattern="/app/demo" access="hasRole('Demo')" />
    <intercept-url pattern="/app/**" access="isAuthenticated()" />
    <intercept-url pattern="/admin/**" access="hasRole('Admin')" />

    <custom-filter position="PRE_AUTH_FILTER"
        ref="currentWindowsIdentityAuthenticationFilter" />

    <logout invalidate-session="true" delete-cookies="JSESSIONID"
        logout-url="/logout" logout-success-url="/logout-success" />

</http>

Read more about request matching mechanism here.

EDIT:

@LukeTaylor mentioned that if you want to create another filter chain then the pattern should go in the element (is this documented somewhere explicitely?), so my idea with separate chain without PRE_AUTH_FILTER obviously won't work. Added <http> for /logout without any filters, which should prevent authorizing at logout requestes.

Still, I don't know how prevent requests like /other from applying PRE_AUTH_FILTER. One way could probably be abandon <http> namespace configuration to manual filterChainProxy configuration with two <sec:filter-chain> patterns, but I don't know if it's worth it.

@Michael-O: About exception IllegalArgumentException: A universal match pattern ('/**') is defined before other patterns - it's strange, is it your whole XML config for Security? Or maybe it's just a consequence of what Luke said (that another <http> element should have pattern)...

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That's strange. The docs say that the FilterChainProxy will decide whether it will pass the request through the chain. I am wondering why this request is passed at all because it is under sec enforcement but not explicitly protected. If I change to Basic auth it will only work because it requires a specific header. Is this ill-designed? I will try the second rule tomorrow. –  Michael-O Sep 27 '12 at 18:33
    
This configuration doesn't look right. If you want to create another filter chain then the pattern should go in the <http> element. In this case you probably want another filter chain that matches "/logout/*", placed before the main one. Then those requests won't be routed through the authentication filter. –  Luke Taylor Sep 27 '12 at 23:21
    
Luke, what should I change to make the preauth filter to be called on secured URLs only? –  Michael-O Sep 28 '12 at 7:54
    
The config above cannot work. It requires an auth entry point. Even if I add one, it fails with: Caused by: java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: A universal match pattern ('/**') is defined before other patterns in the filter chain, causing them to be ignored. –  Michael-O Sep 28 '12 at 8:00
    
@Xaerxess, the IAE is perfectly normal because both <http> intercept on the path /**. This is not allowed. I was able to determine the cause of the problem which I have written in a detailed answer. –  Michael-O Sep 29 '12 at 21:35

I was able to indentify the issue but it cannot be solved the way it is now because of the way the entire chain works.

Here's the deal:

When you define a <http> element on /** you ask Spring Security to fire the entire filter chain on all paths under your defined pattern. It does not matter whether one of them needs protection or not. Rob Winch published a very helpful video. If you take a closer look at the default filter stack you'll what filters are applied. Amidst these is my filter located.

The first ten lines of my log file reveal that the entire chain is fired since / matches the <http> configuration. At the end, the FilterSecurityInterceptor sees that this resource does not need protection. More over, you see that the CurrentWindowsIdentityAuthenticationFilter is fired too and performs unwanted authentication.

Why? Compared to header-based filters or URL processing filters you have no trigger/entry point to commence the authentication deliberately you simply do without challenging the client regardless the URL needs protection or not. Defining something like this <http pattern="/unprotected-url" security="none" /> saves you absolutely nothing because you lose the security context on unprotected paths. You want to keep your client logged in regardless of the URL protection.

How can this be solved now? You have two options:

  1. Define a <http> element on /app/**, /admin/** so on but this is really cumbersome and contains repitions all over. I would not recommend such a solution. Additionally, you probably won't have the sec context on other URLs in /**. This is not desired.
  2. Split the preauth filter in two filters:
    1. CurrentWindowsIdentityPreAuthenticationFilter
    2. CurrentWindowsIdentityUrlAuthenticationFilter

The second option solves the problem.

CurrentWindowsIdentityPreAuthenticationFilter: Remains as-is and peforms the auth always. Very helpful for M2M communication like script access or REST requests. CurrentWindowsIdentityUrlAuthenticationFilter: Suits human interaction very well. It works basically like a form-based filter. If define a URL, say /login, you will get redirected to when you request a protected resource and after successful auto-auth you be redirected back to your actual resource. Auth is done. Public resources remain unauthenticated because the preauth filter is trigged on /login only just like form-based. If you log out you stay logged out.

I'd be happy if any of the Spring folks can confirm my analysis.

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