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I'm updating an old app with an AdBannerView and when there is no ad, it slides off screen. When there is an ad it slides on screen. Basic stuff.

Old style, I set the frame in an animation block. New style, I have a IBOutlet to the constraint which determines the Y position, in this case it's distance from the bottom of the superview, and modify the constant.

- (void)moveBannerOffScreen {
    [UIView animateWithDuration:5
             animations:^{
                          _addBannerDistanceFromBottomConstraint.constant = -32;
                     }];
    bannerIsVisible = FALSE;
}

- (void)moveBannerOnScreen {
    [UIView animateWithDuration:5
             animations:^{
                         _addBannerDistanceFromBottomConstraint.constant = 0;
             }];
    bannerIsVisible = TRUE;
}

And the banner moves, exactly as expected, but no animation.

UPDATE: I re-watched WWDC12 video "Best Practices for Mastering Auto Layout" which covers animation. It discusses how to update constraints using CoreAnimation.

enter image description here enter image description here

I've tried with the following code, but get the exact same results.

- (void)moveBannerOffScreen {
    _addBannerDistanceFromBottomConstraint.constant = -32;
    [UIView animateWithDuration:2
                     animations:^{
                         [self.view setNeedsLayout];
                     }];
    bannerIsVisible = FALSE;
}

- (void)moveBannerOnScreen {
    _addBannerDistanceFromBottomConstraint.constant = 0;
    [UIView animateWithDuration:2
                     animations:^{
                         [self.view setNeedsLayout];
                     }];
    bannerIsVisible = TRUE;
}

On a side note, I have checked numerous times and this is being executed on the main thread.

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1  
This is a really useful question and answer, but the question as written is a little silly due to your minor typo (having setNeedsLayout instead of layoutIfNeeded) being the only reason your code didn't work to start with. :P May I suggest that this would become a better reference question if you were to edit out your entire UPDATE section in your question (and perhaps edit the mention of WWDC12 and the screencaps from it into Gervasio's answer, as an official corroborating reference)? –  Mark Amery Jul 19 '13 at 13:09
    
I've never seen so many votes offered for a question and answer on a typo on SO before –  abbood Sep 30 '13 at 22:25
    
If there is a typo in the answer, you should edit the answer. That's why they're editable. –  jeffamaphone Oct 6 at 21:13
    
@jeffamaphone - It would be more useful if you pointed out the typo so I knew where the mistake was. You could edit the answer yourself and fixed the typo saving everyone else our diatribe. I did just edit it to remove the constant from the animation block, if that's what you were referring to. –  DBD Oct 7 at 14:23
    
I don't know what the typo is. I was responding to comments above. –  jeffamaphone Oct 7 at 16:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 308 down vote accepted

Two important notes:

  1. You need to call layoutIfNeeded within the animation block. Apple actually recommends you call it once before the animation block to ensure that all pending layout operations have been completed
  2. You need to call it specifically on the parent view (e.g. self.view), not the child view that has the constraints attached to it. Doing so will update all constrained views, including animating other views that might be constrained to the view that you changed the constraint of (e.g. View B is attached to the bottom of View A and you just changed View A's top offset and you want View B to animate with it)

Try this:

- (void)moveBannerOffScreen {
    [self.view layoutIfNeeded];

    _addBannerDistanceFromBottomConstraint.constant = -32;
    [UIView animateWithDuration:5
        animations:^{
            [self.view layoutIfNeeded]; // Called on parent view
        }];
    bannerIsVisible = FALSE;
}

- (void)moveBannerOnScreen { 
    [self.view layoutIfNeeded];

    _addBannerDistanceFromBottomConstraint.constant = 0;
    [UIView animateWithDuration:5
        animations:^{
            [self.view layoutIfNeeded]; // Called on parent view
        }];
    bannerIsVisible = TRUE;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I had tried [self.view layoutIfNeeded]; and it didn't make a difference. I re-watched the WWDC12 "Mastering Auto-layout" and I noticed their examples didn't change the constants in the animation block. They changed them BEFORE the block, then only did layoutIfNeeded in the animation block, so when I get back to my machine I'm going to attempt that one. –  DBD Oct 2 '12 at 12:46
15  
You know what... your answer works. The WWDC works.... my vision fails. For some reason it took me a week to realize I was calling setNeedsLayout instead of layoutIfNeeded. I'm slightly horrified by how many hours I spent not noticing I just just typed the wrong method name. –  DBD Oct 15 '12 at 13:36
6  
The solution works but you don't need to change the constraint constant within the animation block. It's totally fine to set the constraint once before kicking off the animation. You should edit your answer. –  Ortwin Gentz Jan 14 '13 at 10:46
19  
This didn't work for me initially and then I realized you need to call layoutIfNeeded on the PARENT view, not the view the constraints apply to. –  Oliver Pearmain Mar 21 '13 at 10:44
4  
using layoutIfNeeded will animate all the subview refreshes not just the constraint change. how do u animate the constraint change only? –  ngb Aug 24 '13 at 12:55

I appreciate the answer provided, but I think it would be nice to take it a bit further.

The basic block animation from the documentation

[containerView layoutIfNeeded]; // Ensures that all pending layout operations have been completed
[UIView animateWithDuration:1.0 animations:^{
     // Make all constraint changes here
     [containerView layoutIfNeeded]; // Forces the layout of the subtree animation block and then captures all of the frame changes
}];

but really this is a very simplistic scenario. What if I want to animate subview constraints via the updateConstraints method?

An animation block that calls the subviews updateConstraints method

[self.view layoutIfNeeded];
[self.subView setNeedsUpdateConstraints];
[self.subView updateConstraintsIfNeeded];
[UIView animateWithDuration:1.0f delay:0.0f options:UIViewAnimationOptionLayoutSubviews animations:^{
    [self.view layoutIfNeeded];
} completion:nil];

The updateConstraints method is overridden in the UIView subclass and must call super at the end of the method.

- (void)updateConstraints
{
    // Update some constraints

    [super updateConstraints];
}

The AutoLayout Guide leaves much to be desired but it is worth reading. I myself am using this as part of a UISwitch that toggles a subview with a pair of UITextFields with a simple and subtle collapse animation (0.2 seconds long). The constraints for the subview are being handled in the UIView subclasses updateConstraints methods as described above.

share|improve this answer
    
For me, this only worked when I changed the first call of [self.view layoutIfNeeded] to [self.view setNeedsLayout] (otherwise layoutSubviews of self was not called). Is this only a typing error or or is the fact that I'm using self instead of self.subView the reason for this different behaviour? –  anneblue Feb 24 at 11:51
    
When calling all the methods above on self.view (and not on a subview of that view), calling updateConstraintsIfNeeded is not necessary (because setNeedsLayout also triggers updateConstraints of that view). Might be trivial for the most, but it was not for me until now ;) –  anneblue Feb 24 at 12:06
    
It is hard to comment without knowing the full interplay of Autolayout and springs and struts layout in your particular case. I'm speaking entirely about a pure autolayout scenario. I would be curious to know what exactly is happening in your layoutSubviews method. –  Cameron Lowell Palmer Feb 24 at 12:19
    
I use your solution in a UITableViewCell subclass (using self instead of self.view of course). The cell's contentView translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints property is set to YES. All its subviews are properly laid out with Auto Layout. In my updateConstraints method I perform the constraint changes, and in my layoutSubviews method I change other UIView-properties that needs to be animated, for example changes on some subview's alpha value. –  anneblue Feb 25 at 12:24
    
translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = NO; If you want to pure-autolayout you should definitely disable this. –  Cameron Lowell Palmer Feb 25 at 13:39
// Step 1, update your constraint
self.myOutletToConstraint.constant = 50; // New height (for example)

// Step 2, trigger animation
[UIView animateWithDuration:2.0 animations:^{

    // Step 3, call layoutIfNeeded on your animated view's parent
    [self.view layoutIfNeeded];
}];
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There is an article talk about this: http://weblog.invasivecode.com/post/42362079291/auto-layout-and-core-animation-auto-layout-was

In which, he coded like this:

- (void)handleTapFrom:(UIGestureRecognizer *)gesture {
    if (_isVisible) {
        _isVisible = NO;
        self.topConstraint.constant = -44.;    // 1
        [self.navbar setNeedsUpdateConstraints];  // 2
        [UIView animateWithDuration:.3 animations:^{
            [self.navbar layoutIfNeeded]; // 3
        }];
    } else {
        _isVisible = YES;
        self.topConstraint.constant = 0.;
        [self.navbar setNeedsUpdateConstraints];
        [UIView animateWithDuration:.3 animations:^{
            [self.navbar layoutIfNeeded];
        }];
    }
}

Hope it helps.

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