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I'm reviewing some team code and I found something like this :

MyObj obj = null;

try {
  obj = myService.findObj(objId)
} catch (MyObjNotFoundException e) {
  // The object wasn't found, it's the "normal" path
  // Here they create the object in DB (but don't touch the obj variable)
  // There is about 60 line of code
}
if (obj != null) {
  // The object already exist, logs are written and some queue is filled
  // with current objId to be processed later on
}

In my review I will write that using Exception to control the normal program flow isn't a good idea, in term of performance or maintainability. The best would be to modify the service to return null instead of throwing an Exception but :

  • I'm not sure they own the service (may be another project/team)
  • They may really need this exception somewhere else

So apart from the performance problem that will not be solved unless not throwing the Exception, I would like to give them a "cleaner" piece of code.

Here is my thought knowing the service only send this Exception :

try {
  obj = myService.findObj(objId)
} finally {
}

if (obj == null) {
  // The object wasn't found, it's the "normal" path
} else {
  // The object already exist, logs are written and some queue is filled
  // with current objId to be processed later on
}

Would you go this way? Does it really make a step onto readability? Would you think of something else ?

Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your suggestion, if the service throws an ObjectNotFoundException, your method also does. Without changing the signature of the service, what the code does currently is the only way to do it.

Or maybe you meant

try {
    obj = myService.findObj(objId)
} 
catch (ObjectNotFoundException) {
    // ignore, obj stays null
}

if (obj == null) {
    // The object wasn't found, it's the "normal" path
} 
else {
    // The object already exist, logs are written and some queue is filled
    // with current objId to be processed later on
}

This is very similar to the current code. In any case, what should be done IMHO to make the code cleaner, is extracting the 60 lines of code of the normal path into another method, itself splitted in several sub-methods.

share|improve this answer
    
You're right, I was so focused on the whole thing I didn't see that. So it'll not help at all, I'll accept this in some minutes – Michael Laffargue Sep 27 '12 at 14:23
    
Aha, I overlooked that, too. I thought it was about completely removing ObjectNotFoundException from all code, not just from the call-site – Lukas Eder Sep 27 '12 at 14:24

Exception is quite suitable when the logic often does something that is not expected to appear in a well-running system. For example, each Person object MUST have one firstname. A person that not contains one firstname is an EXCEPTIONAL thing and must be treated with usage of Exception.

On the contrary, use null to signal that the situation is "normal" but involving no significant result. To keep the same example, a person MAY have two firstnames but it is really optional. A conceptual method called retrieveSecondFirstName() would effectively return null in this case.

I prefer to use Null Pattern when adapted. Look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Null_Object_pattern

Furthermore, throwing Exception or using Null Pattern avoids typical case of NullPointerExcetion at client side.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for feedback. – Michael Laffargue Sep 27 '12 at 14:37

Personally, I don't think your change makes any significant difference at all. Perhaps someone with better knowledge of Java byte optimization can chime in, but I would expect that the extra "weight" of exception handling is still built in, even if there is nothing in the exception block.

One of the biggest reasons to avoid using exception handling as flow control is due to the expense of throwing exceptions. Compilers are not designed to optimize for exception handling; they expect them to be thrown only in exceptional circumstances (pardon the pun) - ie: when the application hits an unexpected condition. Consequently, all emphasis is put on optimizing standard flow control logic (if/else, for, while, etc...). Using exceptions for flow control is a terrible idea, both from a readability perspective and from a performance basis.

Not finding an object is not an unexpected condition. In fact, it is part of the logic/flowchart that should be designed prior to developing the code, and documenting the proper return values based on the expected result. A DB response failure would be an acceptable exception condition - something that happens very infrequently, and truly is an unexpected state.

Essentially, the change that you are proposing, in my view, makes it even more complicated to read. The heart of the issue is the exception being thrown. If that cannot be remedied, I am not convinced that your empty try/catch really helps tremendously. If anything, your code is first saying that you plan to ignore all not found exceptions, but later on, you choose to deal with it, which is somewhat contradictory. If there was a performance gain from it, it would be something I would understand, but like I said, I believe the most expensive part is throwing the exception, not actually catching it.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I'll just go with the speech about performance and readability, and as usual I think everything will stay the way it is ;) – Michael Laffargue Sep 27 '12 at 14:24

I like to use exception instead of returning null, because you can pass the reason for a occurrence of a error, to the user. It's better than just returning null, from my point of view.

share|improve this answer
    
In that case it's not error since the Exception is the algorithm "normal flow" – Michael Laffargue Sep 27 '12 at 14:18

There's no right or wrong way to do this. I can only tell you that the ObjectNotFoundException-pattern had been around since the early days of J2EE and EJB 2.0. It was common to throw that subclass of FinderException at a time when a typical piece of business logic involved catching about 17 gazillion annoying checked exceptions just to wrap most of them in RuntimeExceptions to be able to rethrow them into Nirvana.

Nowadays, returning null might've become more popular again, because not finding an object isn't such an exception anyways, and null has precisely that semantics. Other than that, null is no better than ObjectNotFoundException. Just a matter of taste.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I did put ObjectNotFoundException but in fact it's an internal class of the project. Nothing to do with yours ;). I'll modify it. – Michael Laffargue Sep 27 '12 at 14:19
    
@MichaelLaffargue: Yes I thought so, but the pattern is the same – Lukas Eder Sep 27 '12 at 14:20

There is no definite answer, it depends on how findObj() is expected to work. Does it return an object in majority of cases? If object is not found , is it an exceptional situation, is it something that is unexpected? I think not in this case and I would return null here. Exception-based version is harder to read and maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, as mentioned, I only have access to some code and don't know the context of the project. I'll ask these questions to the developing team. Thanks ! – Michael Laffargue Sep 27 '12 at 14:36

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