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Kinda new to Rgeluar expressions and for the benefit of learning wanted to know how to do the following on one line:

page matching regular expression: .pdf/$

and page containing "somestring"

and page excluding "someotherstring"

I can obtain my desired output using the 3 rules above. My question is can I put all into one line using regular expression? So the first line would be something like:

page matching reg exp: .pdf/$ somestring+ (then regex for does not contain in GA) someotherstring

Is it possible to put all in a oner?

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Do you really need the slash after .pdf? –  Bergi Sep 27 '12 at 14:27
    
I didn't think so either but when testing it I did –  Doug Firr Sep 27 '12 at 14:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Lookahead will help you to match multiple independent things in one expression, and even allows to require non-matching. In your case:

/^(?=.*somestring)(?!.*someotherstring).*\.pdf$/
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Brilliant, thanks a lot. Could you help by clarifying: Why the "^" second character? What does ?=.* mean in English?! I am googling it but working myself into confusion. Thanks for your help on this. –  Doug Firr Sep 27 '12 at 14:40
    
If you omitted the start of string anchor, the regex might have matched only a part of your input (depending on the invocation). I already linked a doc for the lookahead expression. In English: It asserts that now follows an arbitrary number of chars and then the word "somestring". –  Bergi Sep 27 '12 at 14:58
    
Thanks Bergi that helps –  Doug Firr Sep 27 '12 at 19:12
1  
Lookahead is not fully supported by Google Analytics. –  Luck Sep 27 '12 at 20:54
    
This doesn't work in Google Analytics –  billy Apr 11 '13 at 14:35

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