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i'm wondering what does this do:

std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char>>::
basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char>>
(&myText, "hello world");

my first guess is that it's allocating "hello world" to a myText variable if that's true then what does it do in this case :

  if ( v106 == v67 || 
  std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char>>::
  basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char>>
  (&v109,"program"), v137 = 1)
  {
    BYTE3(v95) = 0;
  }

it's not really a condition...

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2  
Something about your code got mangled. This is not valid C++. Maybe you lost some linebreaks somewhere? –  Sebastian Redl Sep 27 '12 at 14:23
2  
Where did you get this code from?\ –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 27 '12 at 14:23
1  
What is char_std? That's a slightly rude way of asking for real code. –  Pete Becker Sep 27 '12 at 14:23
1  
Calls of string constructor is incorrect really. –  ForEveR Sep 27 '12 at 14:27
1  
It should be clear from this that all that mess is available as the convenient but little known typedef std::string. –  BoBTFish Sep 27 '12 at 14:30
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guess this is output from Hex-Ray's decompiler plugin for IDA, am I right? This is the way it displays the call of the constructor of the std::string class. v109 is the memory allocated on the stack to hold the std::string instance, while the second parameter, "hello world", is the string to initialize it with.

In cases where multiple conditions lead to the same resulting code, compilers often choose to reuse the (equivalent) code fragment from a previous condition to minimize the size of the generated bytecode. Hex-Ray's decompiler plugin often displays them using the Comma-operator up to version 1.5 - newer versions of the decompiler have a better understanding of such situations.

if (v106 == v67)
    BYTE3(v95) = 0;

std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>,
                  std::allocator<char>>
                  ::basic_string<char, 
                      std::char_traits<char>, 
                      std::allocator<char>>(&v109,"program");
v137 = 1;
BYTE3(v95) = 0;

This is more likely to look like the actual source. Replacing the huge std::basic_string<...> construct with a simple std::string declaration makes it even more readable.

if (v106 == v67)
    BYTE3(v95) = 0;

std::string v109("program");
v137 = 1;
BYTE3(v95) = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks yeah that's what i thought, but in the "if" assigning a text to a variable is not a condition as far as i know.. –  MeeKaaH Sep 27 '12 at 15:16
    
I just edited my answer to better fit your question. ;) –  athreoz Sep 27 '12 at 15:37
    
Thanks alot that's clear now :) –  MeeKaaH Sep 27 '12 at 16:27
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