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I am using jquery, JSON, and AJAX for a comment system. I am curious, is there a size limit on what you can send through/store with JSON? Like if a user types a large amount and I send it through JSON is there some sort of maximum limit?

Also can any kind of text be sent through JSON. for example sometime I allow users to use html, will this be ok?

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Actually, i think there's some kind of limit but i have not been able to determine it; here's the case: I have an Asp.Net page (don't judge me, i was asked to work with it) which queries the DB and gets a datatable with around 2000 rows and 27 columns. If i drop the datatable to an XML, the request from the client works, slow but works, since js is creating the table and doing some stuff.. anyway... I did a DataTable To jSon routine which has always worked for me like a charm, but in this case, that huge amount of data seems to be truncated, or something else is going on, but the server respon –  Sam Ccp Aug 9 '11 at 16:26
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Be careful how you interpret people's answers below! Most answers say there are no limits to 'JSON' itself. While most servers will have a configurable limit. I ran a simple AJAX test where I incremented a byte on each send and at approx 8K bytes, it failed on several PHP/Apache servers I tried now. Error was: "414 (Request-URI Too Large)" –  Jeach Apr 29 '13 at 22:00
    
We reliably send/receive 100kb payloads on iOS/iPhone. Something to beware of is that many protocols receive data in chunks, and attempting to deserialize the chunk rather than waiting for all the data to be received will result in failure, unless your deserializer logic is specially set up for it. –  Hot Licks Nov 21 '13 at 12:16
    
@Jeach - That failure was almost certainly due to the data transmission being broken into 8K blocks, then not properly reassembled on the other end before attempting to parse. –  Hot Licks Jul 16 at 16:18
    
@HotLicks I'm not sure what the error was or what caused it, but I do know that my tests were done on reliable 1GB/s dedicated links. So if it failed there, it would definitely fail for your common browser/server links. The product I tested it with is a commercial product we sell that reliably transfers multiple GB of audio per second. I will look into what you mean by broken 8K blocks but in the end I would expect it to fail as much (or more) when used in the cloud. –  Jeach Jul 17 at 5:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 36 down vote accepted

JSON is similar to other data formats like XML - if you need to transmit more data, you just send more data. There's no inherent size limitation to the overall JSON request itself. Any limitation would be set by the server parsing the JSON request. (For instance, ASP.NET has the "MaxJsonLength" property of the serializer.)

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so technicly, If I wanted to take the WHOLE sourcecode to this whole page, it could be sent as a json object? –  jasondavis Aug 11 '09 at 19:27
    
Yes, with proper encoding. –  x3ro Aug 11 '09 at 19:28
    
@jasondavis, Easily. –  bdonlan Aug 11 '09 at 19:28
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It may be worth noting that the "default is 2097152 characters, which is equivalent to 4 MB of Unicode string data" for the property JavaScriptSerializer.MaxJsonLength mentioned in Amber's answer. (N.B. I have quoted from MSDN) –  dumbledad Dec 12 '12 at 20:38
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@AsadHasan A server can parse or serialize, depending on which direction the data is going. –  Amber Nov 13 '13 at 18:06

There is no fixed limit on how large a JSON data block is or any of the fields.

There are limits to how much JSON the JavaScript implementation of various browsers can handle (e.g. around 40MB in my experience). See this question for example.

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8K is an exceptionally small limit for JSON. I suspect that's not a limit for the JSON, but rather the data is being transmitted in 8K blocks, and the code receiving the data is attempting to deserialize an individual block rather than waiting for the entire payload to arrive. –  Hot Licks Nov 22 '13 at 1:57
    
I'd bet you are correct Hot Licks. I updated my answer. –  cdiggins Jul 16 at 16:07

It depends on the implementation of your JSON writer/parser. Microsoft's DataContractJsonSerializer seems to have a hard limit around 8kb (8192 I think), and it will error out for larger strings.

Edit: We were able to resolve the 8K limit for JSON strings by setting the MaxJsonLength property in the web config as described in this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/1151993/61569

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An 8K "limit" is almost certainly a data transmission block boundary, not the limit for a JSON document. Larger strings can be processed by correctly reassembling the multi-block transmission. –  Hot Licks Jul 16 at 16:16
    
It's been a while since we figured out how to change the 8K limit in the DataContractJsonSerializer, but I think it was the "MaxJsonLength" setting (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) –  Anthony F Jul 18 at 18:49

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