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Hello I'm trying to delete my dynamic memory within my class but I am getting the following error :

a.out(2830) malloc: *** error for object 0x7fb38a4039c0: pointer being freed was not allocated

* set a breakpoint in malloc_error_break to debug Abort trap: 6

I think is has something to do with my overloaded "=" operator not accessing my class directly "&".

class Polynomial{
    public:
        //Constructors / Destructors
        Polynomial();
        Polynomial(int tempNum, int * tempPoly);
        ~Polynomial();

        //Member Functions & Operator overloading
        //Addition
        Polynomial operator+(Polynomial& Poly);
        //Subtraction
        Polynomial operator-(Polynomial& Poly);
        //Multiplication
        Polynomial operator*(Polynomial& Poly);
        //Assignment
        Polynomial operator=(Polynomial Poly);

        //Insertion
        friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, Polynomial& Poly);
        //Extraction
        friend istream& operator>>(istream& is, Polynomial& Poly);

    private:
        //Data Members
        //Int array (degree of polynomial + 1)
        int * poly;
        int polyNum;
};


Implementation: 

Polynomial::Polynomial(){
    polyNum = 0;
}

Polynomial::~Polynomial(){
    //Delete Dynamic Memory
    delete [] poly;
}

Polynomial::Polynomial(int tempNum, int *tempPoly){

    poly = new int[tempNum+1];

    polyNum = tempNum;

    for (int i=0; i < tempNum; i++) {
        poly[i] = tempPoly[i];
    }
}

//Addition
Polynomial Polynomial::operator+(Polynomial &Poly){
    Polynomial temp;

    if(polyNum > Poly.polyNum){
        temp.polyNum = polyNum;
    }
    else{
        temp.polyNum = Poly.polyNum;
    }

    temp.poly = new int[temp.polyNum + 1];

    for(int i=0; i < temp.polyNum; i++){
        temp.poly[i] = Poly.poly[i] + poly[i];
    }

    return (temp);
}

//Subtraction
Polynomial Polynomial::operator-(Polynomial& Poly){
    Polynomial temp;

    if(polyNum > Poly.polyNum){
        temp.polyNum = polyNum;
    }
    else{
        temp.polyNum = Poly.polyNum;
    }

    temp.poly = new int[temp.polyNum + 1];

    for(int i=0; i < temp.polyNum; i++){
        temp.poly[i] = poly[i] - Poly.poly[i];
    }

    return (temp);
}

//Multiplication
Polynomial Polynomial::operator*(Polynomial& Poly){

    Polynomial temp;

    //make coefficient array
    temp.polyNum = (polyNum + Poly.polyNum) - 1;

    temp.poly = new int [temp.polyNum];

    for (int i = 0; i < temp.polyNum; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < Poly.polyNum; j++){
            temp.poly[i+j] += poly[i] * Poly.poly[j];
        }
    }

    return temp;
}

//Assignment
Polynomial Polynomial::operator=(Polynomial Poly){

    polyNum = Poly.polyNum;

    poly = new int[polyNum+1];

    for (int i=0; i < polyNum; i++) {
        poly[i] = Poly.poly[i];
    }

    return *this;
}

//Insertion
ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, Polynomial& Poly){

    for (int i=0; i < Poly.polyNum; i++) {
        os << Poly.poly[i] << " x^" << i;

        if(i != Poly.polyNum - 1){
            os << " + ";
        }
    }

    return os;
}

//Extraction
istream& operator>>(istream& is, Polynomial& Poly){

    int numP = 0;
    int * tempP;

    is >> numP;

    tempP = new int [numP+1];

    for (int i=0; i < numP; i++) {
        is >> tempP[i];
    }

    Poly.polyNum = numP;

    Poly.poly = new int[Poly.polyNum +1];

    for (int i=0; i < Poly.polyNum; i++) {
        Poly.poly[i] = tempP[i];
    }

    delete [] tempP;

    return is;
}

Main

int main(){

// Input Polynomial #1 (P1)
cout << "Input polynominal p1: " << endl;
Polynomial P1;
cin >> P1;

// Output Polynominal
cout << "p1(x) = " << P1 << '\n' << endl;

// Input Polynomial #2 (P2)
cout << "Input polynominal p2: " << endl;
Polynomial P2;
cin >> P2;

// Output Polynominal
cout << "p2(x) = " << P2 << '\n' << endl;

// Copy P2 to P3 and output P3
Polynomial P3;
P3 = P2;
cout << "Copy p2 to p3, p3(x) = " << P3 << '\n' << endl;

// Add P1 to P2 and output to P3
Polynomial P4;
P4 = P1 + P2;
cout << "p3(x) = p1(x) + p2(x) = " << P4 << '\n' << endl;

// Subtract P1 from P2 and output to P3
Polynomial P5;
P5 = P1 - P2;
cout << "p3(x) = p1(x) - p2(x) = " << P5 << '\n' << endl;

// Subtract P2 from P1 and output to P3
Polynomial P6;
P6 = P2 - P1;
cout << "p3(x) = p2(x) - p1(x) = " << P6 << '\n' << endl;

// Multiply P1 by P2 and output to P3
Polynomial P7;
P7 = P1 * P2;
cout << "p3(x) = p1(x) * p2(x) = " << P7 << '\n' << endl;

return 0;

}

share|improve this question
    
Can you post an example program that causes the error? I see a leak on the = operator. –  nmenezes Sep 27 '12 at 14:49
    
@nmenezes i put my main program up there for you –  Daniel D C Sep 27 '12 at 14:52
    
Three things: Second is that you allocate polyNum+1 but you only use polyNum entries in the allocated array. Second is that in the assignment operator you do not free the existing array if you have one, leading to a memory leak. Thirdly, why not use e.g. std::vector so you don't have to worry about these things? –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 27 '12 at 14:56
    
just use std::vector<int> instead of poly and polynum. Saves you a lot of pain. –  Walter Sep 27 '12 at 14:58
    
A fourth thing, the assignment operator should return a reference, not a copy like you do now. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 27 '12 at 15:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
Polynomial::Polynomial(){
    polyNum = 0;
}
Polynomial::~Polynomial(){
    //Delete Dynamic Memory
    delete [] poly;           // <-- bug
}

here is a bug for you: poly is not initialised in the default ctor, but deleted in the dtor.

EDIT

really you should use a std::vector<int>:

class polynomial
{
  std::vector<int> _pol;       
public:
  size_t degree() const { return _pol.empty()? 0 : _pol.size() - 1; }
  polynomial() = default;                   // could be omitted (compiler generated anyway)
  polynomial(polynomial const&) = default;  // ----
  /// evaluate polynomial
  template<typename T>
  T operator() (T const&x) const
  {
    T y(0);
    T p(1);
    for(auto i : _pol) {
      y += *i * p;
      p *= x;
    }
    return y;
  }
  polynomial& operator+=(polynomial const&other)
  {
    auto j = other._pol.begin();
    for(auto i = _pol.begin(); i!=_pol.end() && j!=other._pol.end(); ++i,++j)
      *i += *j;
    for(; j != other._pol.end(); ++j)
      _pol.push_back(*j);
    return*this;
  }
  polynomial operator+(polynomial const&other) const
  {
    polynomial _p(*this);
    return _p += other;           
  }
  // etc
};

You should also implement the move ctor and operator appropriately so that in expressions like polynomial sum = a+b; no re-allocation of memory is required when copying a temporary.

share|improve this answer
    
ok so what should i do? if i set the amount of poly somewhere else? –  Daniel D C Sep 27 '12 at 14:58
    
@DanielDC edit to correct my code –  Walter Sep 27 '12 at 15:20

You have a default constructor (which has a bug) and assignment operator, but you also need to define a copy constructor. If you don't, each copy of a Polynomial gets the same pointer for poly that the one it was copied from has, and you deallocate the same pointer each time one of those copies is destroyed. The second time this happens, you call delete[] on a pointer that was already delete[]ed, causing this error.

Your copy constructor should look something like this

Polynomial::Polynomial(const Polynomial& rhs) : poly(new int[rhs.polynum]), polynum(rhs.polynum) {
    std::copy(rhs.poly, rhs.poly + polynum, poly);
}

That said, if you use std::vector you wouldn't have to have either an assignment operator or a copy constructor, and not even a separate variable to keep track of how many polys you have, so I recommend doing that.

You also need to fix your default constructor; at least set poly to nullptr so that you don't delete[] an uninitialised pointer in your destructor.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok i need this to be explained a bit further :( can you show me some code ? –  Daniel D C Sep 27 '12 at 15:07
    
@DanielDC did you still need explanation or did Walter's answer clarify it? –  Seth Carnegie Sep 27 '12 at 15:24

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