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I am trying to generate randomly basic math operations(addition, subtractions, multiplication and division) and sometime my function returns NaN. I used function parseInt(), but I still have the same problem. I will appreciate if anybody can help me with any suggestion. Thank you in advance!

Here is my code:

function randNum(min,max)
{
    var num = min+Math.floor((Math.random()*(max-min+1)));
    return num;
}

var choose, operator, firstNum, secondNum,rightAnswer;
function getProb()
{
    var chooseOp=randNum(1,4);
    choose=parseInt(chooseOp);

if (choose==1)
{
    oprator="+";
    var choose1=randNum(0,10);
    var choose2=randNum(0,10);
    firstNum=parseInt(choose1);
    secondNum=parseInt(choose2);
    document.getElementById("mathProb").innerHTML=firstNum+operator+secondNum+"=";
    rightAnswer=choose1 + choose2;
}
else if (choose==2)
{
    operator="-";
    var choose1=randNum(0,10);
    var choose2=randNum(0,10);
    firstNum=parseInt(choose1);
    secondNum=parseInt(choose2);
    document.getElementById("mathProb").innerHTML=firstNum+operator+secondNum+"=";
    rightAnswer=firstNum - secondNum;
}
else if (choose==3)
{
    operator="x";
    var choose1=randNum(0,10);
    var choose2=randNum(0,10);
    firstNum=parseInt(choose1);
    secondNum=parseInt(choose2);
    document.getElementById("mathProb").innerHTML=firstNum+operator+secondNum+"=";
    rightAnswer=choose1 * choose2;
}
    else if (choose==4)
{
    operator="/";
    var choose1=randNum(0,10);
    var choose2=randNum(0,10);
    firstNum=parseInt(choose1);
    secondNum=parseInt(choose2);
    document.getElementById("mathProb").innerHTML=firstNum+operator+secondNum+"=";
    rightAnswer=choose1/choose2;
}
}
share|improve this question
6  
    
I'd also suggest to use a switch construct to avoid all those if (choose==. –  dystroy Sep 27 '12 at 15:07
2  
There's no need to use parseInt() here at all. –  Pointy Sep 27 '12 at 15:07
1  
choose1/choose2 will sometimes be Infinity. –  dystroy Sep 27 '12 at 15:12
1  
@Shusl choose2 is an integer in [0, 10]. –  dystroy Sep 27 '12 at 15:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When choose==1, operator is misspelled as oprator. If you correct it, problem is solved http://jsfiddle.net/uERwd/2/

UPDATE: Your code can be made shorter as: http://jsfiddle.net/uERwd/3/

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the only answer mentioning (and solving) the actual problem AND showing the sensible (DRY) way of doing this task. ) –  raina77ow Sep 27 '12 at 15:32
    
Made your code a bit more dry, btw. ) –  raina77ow Sep 27 '12 at 15:50
    
Thank you a lot. I modified "operator" for the first case, addition. Also, to avoid division by zero, and to have an integer as a result, I modified: else if (choose==4) { operator="/"; var choose2=randNum(1,10); var choose1=choose2 *randNum(0,10); ...} I will make my code shorter and DRY. Thank you again sv_in! –  Lavinia Sep 27 '12 at 16:14
    
@raina77ow, that is good piece of code, IMO. I just intended to show a quick example on how to reduce JS code –  sv_in Sep 28 '12 at 13:29
    
@LaviniaTomole, raina77ow's code is pretty neat. You can check that to get some more pointers to keep it DRY –  sv_in Sep 28 '12 at 13:31

Your division operation has the possibility of dividing by zero, which would return NaN.

share|improve this answer
    
No exactly : 1/0 gives Infinity. Only 0/0 gives NaN. –  dystroy Sep 27 '12 at 15:15
    
Well, he has the possibility of getting that too. –  Homr Zodyssey Sep 27 '12 at 15:16
    
He doesn't output this result, so he clearly wasn't talking about it. –  raina77ow Sep 27 '12 at 15:25
    
Thank you a lot. To avoid division by zero, and to have an integer as a result, I modified: else if (choose==4) { operator="/"; var choose2=randNum(1,10); var choose1=choose2 *randNum(0,10); ...} –  Lavinia Sep 27 '12 at 16:16

Your "NaN" bug is here :

rightAnswer=choose1/choose2;

choose1 an choose2 are integer in [0, 1].

One time over 121, you're dividing 0 by 0, wich gives NaN.

And a little less than one time over 11, you're dividing a not null number by 0, wich gives Infinity.

share|improve this answer

You need to specify with a number that represent numeral system, tipically, base 10

http://www.w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_parseint.asp

Add the number 10 to the function call like this

firstNum = parseInt(choose1, 10);
share|improve this answer
    
No need to parseInt here, first; no error goes from that misuse here (and will be fixed by that answer), second. –  raina77ow Sep 27 '12 at 15:31

When you randomly choose the division operator, it's possible to have zero come out for both choose1 and choose1, which means you attempt to evaluate rightAnswer = 0 / 0;. In Javascript, this equals NaN. Additionally, and this should happen more often, if you choose zero in the denominator any other number in the numerator the answer will come out as Infinity. Of course, zero over anything is zero.

share|improve this answer

It's a simple syntax error:

oprator="+"; // should be `operator`

That's why this statement...

firstNum+operator+secondNum+"=";

... will actually be evaluated as ...

firstNum+undefined+secondNum+"=";

The first pair will give you NaN, NaN + Number will be a NaN again, and NaN + String ("=") will result in NaN converted to string, then appended with '=' (hence resulting 'NaN=').

I'd strongly recommend placing "use strict"; line at the beginning of your scripts to catch such errors. With this, you'll get an error:

ReferenceError: assignment to undeclared variable oprator

... and won't need to make SO parse your script for errors instead. )

Sidenotes, I have plenty of them:

  • your randNum function will return you a Number, so no need to use parseInt (you may have to convert arguments of this function, but even that seems not to be necessary here) on its result;

  • if you divide by zero, you get Infinity; if you divide zero by zero, you get NaN as a result; be prepared or adjust the minimums. )

  • you violate DRY principle, repeating most of the statements outputting a result, why don't convert them into a function? Check this snippet (started by @sv_in, completed by me) for example how to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you raina77ow. I will correct all my mistakes :) –  Lavinia Sep 27 '12 at 16:18

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