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I am running into an issue with field inheritance. First I will explain how I would like it to work, and then ask for suggestions on how I can change the syntax to do what I want.

Here's what I tried:

public abstract class A
{
    public abstract D D1
    {
        get;
    }

    protected D _d2;
    public virtual D D2
    {
        get { return _d2; }
        set { _d2 = value; }
    }
}

public abstract class B : A
{
    protected D _d1;
    public override D D1
    {
        get { return _d1; }
        set
        {
            _d1 = value;
            Update();
        }
    }
}

public abstract class C : A
{
    public override D D1
    {
        get
        {
            return _d2.Find1();
        }
    }

    public override D D2
    {
        get { return base.D2; }
        set
        {
            base.D2 = value;
            Update();
        }
    }
}

The problem is that A doesn't compile because it can't find an method to override with D1's set. This how I expected it to work:

A ab = new B();
print(ab.D1);
ab.D1 = 4; // I would expect a compiler error
((B)ab).D1 = 4; // I would expect a compiler error

A ac = new C();
print(ac.D1);
ac.D1 = 4; // I would expect a compiler error
((C)ac).D1 = 4; // **I would expect this to work**

One solution I can see would be to add "set;" to A1's D1 and throw a NotImplementedException if I try to use it in C, but that would prevent the issue from showing up in the compiler. Anyone know of a way around this issue? I would really like to keep them as fields so that I can display them using WPF.

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1  
Looks to me like your abstract A class requires a readonly implementation, and you wish to make it read/write; therefore, in your A class (and C class), make it read/write. If you want the D1 property to be readonly only some of the time (bad design), you might consider using interfaces. –  Jeremy Sep 27 '12 at 16:56
1  
What is the compiler error that you are encountering? –  JG in SD Sep 27 '12 at 16:57
    
@Jeremy What I would like to see is that B.D1 is read/write, but C.D1 is readonly because it is referred to by C.D2. Is that at all possible? –  hypehuman Sep 27 '12 at 17:00
    
@JGinSD Error '<B.D1>.set': cannot override because '<A.D1>' does not have an overridable set accessor –  hypehuman Sep 27 '12 at 17:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your error is with class B. In class A you define D1 as public abstract D D1 { get; } However in B you are attempting to override D1 and add a setter -- which is not defined by the abstract class. You'll need to find another way to set the value in B. If other classes need to be able to set D1 then you may want to define D1 as public abstract D D1 { get; set; }

If B only need to be able to set the value, just have it directly set the member value.

share|improve this answer
    
I was afraid of that. I decided to fix it by removing B.D1.set and adding a method B.SetD1(D value). Now the question is... would C# be better if my syntax were allowed :) I don't see a problem with being able to add a setter or getter to a field in a child class, as long as it can only be accessed when you know you're dealing with that class. –  hypehuman Sep 27 '12 at 17:11
    
@hypehuman While it would be nice to be able to add a setter like you are trying unfortunately the language spec doesn't allow it for subclasses. If you were using interfaces the adding of a setter to a get only property would be allowed. –  JG in SD Sep 27 '12 at 17:16

Extending a property with a setter does not work with class inheritance; however, it works with interface implementation

public interface I
{
    int Prop { get; }
}

public abstract class A : I
{
    public abstract int Prop { get; protected set; }
    public abstract int Prop2 { get; }
}

public class B : A
{
    public override int Prop
    {
        get;
        set; // ERROR: Cannot change accesibility here.
    }

    public override Prop2 { get; set; } // ERROR: Cannot add setter here.
}

public class C : I
{
    public int Prop { get; set; } // OK: Adding a setter works here.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Cool, I didn't know that! It wouldn't be ideal in my case because B and C share most of their logic. Any idea why this isn't allowed with class inheritance? –  hypehuman Sep 27 '12 at 17:16
    
Although not very elegant, you can use methods instead of properties. The base class would have a public abstract int GetProp() and the derived class would add a public void SetProp(int value) –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Sep 27 '12 at 17:26
    
Someone using the base class's property offering only a getter can assume that the property is readonly. If you could add a setter in a derived class, susbstituting an object of the derived class for an object of the base class could break the logic of a method assuming taht the peroperty is readonly! See: Liskov substitution principle on Wikipedia. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Sep 27 '12 at 17:33

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