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I am just learning python (first language ever) and am implementing what I find in ways that I find fun. I built a pseudo slot machine odds calculator. However, it stops at one Grand prize win. Is there a way to make it run over and over to give an average number of attempts for n amount of games to get the grand prize?

Here's my code

#!/usr/bin/env python
import random

a = 1

while a >0 :
    l1 = random.randrange(36)
    l2 = random.randrange(36)
    l3 = random.randrange(36)

    print l1, l2, l3
    if l1 == l2 == l3 == 7:
        print 'grand prize winner!!!'
        break
    elif l1 == l2 == l3:
        print 'you won! congratulations'
        print 'it took', a, 'attempts to win'
    else:
        a += 1
        print 'sorry...  try again'
        print 'attempt', a

Also, is there a way to tell me how many normal wins there were during the course of winning that grand prize

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The break statement in the grand prize if block exits the outer while loop. If you want it to keep going, remove the break. Also, as a style point, while True: or while 1: is a bit clearer of a way to create an infinite loop. As far as the second part of your question, you have the a counter, but you may want to capture more data, like so:

import random

def play(till_jackpot_count):
    game_data_per_jackpot = [{'plays' : 0, 'wins' : 0}]
    wheel_values = xrange(36)
    wheels = [0, 0, 0]
    while till_jackpot_count >= len(game_data_per_jackpot):
        wheels = [random.choice(wheel_values) for wheel in wheels]
        game_data_per_jackpot[-1]['plays'] += 1
        print '%d plays since last jackpot' % game_data_per_jackpot[-1]['plays']
        print '%d wins since last jackpot' % game_data_per_jackpot[-1]['wins']
        print '%d total plays' % sum([data['plays'] for data in game_data_per_jackpot])
        print '%d total wins' % sum([data['wins'] for data in game_data_per_jackpot])
        print '%d total jackpots' % (len(game_data_per_jackpot) - 1)
        print 'this play: {} {} {}'.format(*wheels)
        if len(set(wheels)) == 1:
            if wheels[0] == 7:
                print 'jackpot!'
                game_data_per_jackpot.append({'plays' : 0, 'wins' : 0})
            else:
                print 'win!'
                game_data_per_jackpot[-1]['wins'] += 1
    return game_data_per_jackpot[:-1]

play(10)

I also snuck a control till_jackpot_count in at the top that will make the loop end after that number of jackpots. The function also returns the test results if you want to analyze them further outside of the function itself, but the result just gets dropped here because it is not assigned to anything.

For your own study, this code uses lists ([]), dicts ({}), tuples (()), old style string formatting ('%d' % var), new style string formatting ('{} {} {}'.format(*iterable)), list comprehensions ([a for a in b]), slicing (list[:]), and a few builtins (sum, len) in addition to the random library and while loop you're already familiar with. I also swapped out your random.randrange() for a somewhat simpler, probably more efficient, random.sample() of a pre-built xrange().

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Wow. I feel like I just spoke a little of a new language to a fluent speaker who countered back with more than I could comprehend. Still, I am very thankful for the new direction and look forward to playing with this code to understand all of it's aspects. Thank you. –  kriskringle Sep 27 '12 at 18:55
1  
So I wanted to learn a little about what you put down on this answer and I have come across more than a handful of difficulties. First off, it doesn't run. I am figuring that this is because len(game_data) starts out at 1 while till_jackpot starts out at 10. I believe that you're while statement needs to be flipped to a > instead of the less than sign there now. After changing that, I let it run and run for hours, never yielding a win or a jackpot. Then it hit me that xrange() gives 3 different numbers every time. Once a number is used, it is eliminated. This code would just run forever. –  kriskringle Oct 1 '12 at 22:27
    
Good catch on the less than, thanks for that. As to the infinite running, you are correct, I tried to get too fancy. I'll switch it back to the list comprehension I had before. –  Silas Ray Oct 2 '12 at 13:10
    
I also swapped out the if check on the wheels, so now all you have to do to change the number of wheels on the 'machine' is to up the number of starting elements in the list. –  Silas Ray Oct 2 '12 at 13:17
    
I love the new if check for the wheels. It's genius. I have incorporated many of the aspects you have shown me here and now have a cleaner code that does exactly what I was going for. Thank you for helping me bring this code to premonition. –  kriskringle Oct 3 '12 at 15:26
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To run some code n times, you should write

for _ in range(n):
    # some code

To run it while some condition holds, you should write

while condition:
    #some code

To run it infinitely, you should write

while 1:
     # some code

(because the condition 1 is always true).

The keyword break will get you out of the loop you are in, even if the condition doesn't hold.


Start by setting up the slot machine code:

GRAND_PRIZE = 0
REGULAR_PRIZE = 1
NO_PRIZE = 2

def slot_machine():
    l1 = random.randrange(36)
    l2 = random.randrange(36)
    l3 = random.randrange(36)

    if l1 == l2 == l3:
        return GRAND_PRIZE if l1 == 7 else REGULAR_PRIZE
    else:
        return NO_PRIZE

Next, set up the code to run this until you win.

def run_until_win():
    num_tries = 0
    num_wins = 0

    while 1:
        num_tries += 1
        result = slot_machine()

        if result == GRAND_PRIZE:
            break
        elif result == REGULAR_PRIZE:
            num_wins += 1

    return num_tries, num_wins

Finally, run this ten times:

for _ in range(10):
    print "tries: {0}, wins: {1}".format(*run_until_win())
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Clear and concise. You stayed within my understanding. I appreciate that greatly. Thank you. –  kriskringle Sep 27 '12 at 19:05
    
It is better to write while True: instead of while 1:. The later is what people got used to when there were no True and False available. –  pepr Oct 2 '12 at 13:46
    
@pepr while 1 is a Python convention -- it's (trivially) faster because there's no global lookup for True, and because of that it's become basically universal. while True is also completely fine, of course. –  katrielalex Oct 4 '12 at 22:36
    
@katrielalex Readability counts. Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules. –  pepr Oct 5 '12 at 19:39
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You just need to count each time you win then at the end print the total ... (see wins below)

#!/usr/bin/env python
import random
def play():
  a = 1
  wins = 0
  while a >0 :
    l1 = random.randrange(36)
    l2 = random.randrange(36)
    l3 = random.randrange(36)

    print l1, l2, l3
    if l1 == l2 == l3 == 7:
        #print 'grand prize winner!!!'
        break
    elif l1 == l2 == l3:
        #print 'you won! congratulations'
        #print 'it took', a, 'attempts to win'
        wins += 1
    else:
        a += 1
        print 'sorry...  try again'
        print 'attempt', a
  return a,wins
  #print "You Won %s Times!"%wins

play_again = True
while play_again:
    tries,wins = play()
    print "It Took %d Tries to win the Grand Prize"%tries
    print "You won normally %d Times"%wins
    play_again = raw_input("Play Again(y/n)?")==y
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The OP's original question was to fix the wonky while loop, which this doesn't do. –  katrielalex Sep 27 '12 at 17:03
    
there... i was answering his second part ... –  Joran Beasley Sep 27 '12 at 17:06
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Nothing is wrong with your 'while' loop, it escapes as it should. Now, if you want to run it several time, you could wrap it in a for i in range(number_of_games) loop. Each time you exit the while loop, you would append the a to a list.

nb_attempts = []
for i in range(nb_games):
    while True:
        ...
        if (l1 == l2 == l3 == 7):
            nb_attempts.append(a)
            break
        elif ...

At the end of your n games, you have a list of n number of attempts..attempts.

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