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First of all, I've found a lot of threads on StackOverflow about this, but none of them really helped me, so sorry to ask possibly duplicate question.

I'm running JUnit tests using spring-test, my code looks like this

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)  
@ContextConfiguration(locations = {})
public class StudentSystemTest {

    @Autowired
    private StudentSystem studentSystem;

    @Before
    public void initTest() {
    // set up the database, create basic structure for testing
    }

    @Test
    public void test1() {
    }    
    ...  
}

My problem is that I want my tests to NOT influence other tests. So I'd like to create something like rollback for each test. I've searched a lot for this, but I've found nothing so far. I'm using Hibernate and MySql for this

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What do you mean by rollback ?. Cleaning the database ? –  Gaurav Sep 27 '12 at 17:02
    
setting it to the exactly the same state it was after executing initTest –  Ján Vorčák Sep 27 '12 at 17:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Just add @Transactional annotation on top of your test:

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)  
@ContextConfiguration(locations = {"testContext.xml"})
@Transactional
public class StudentSystemTest {

By default Spring will start a new transaction surrounding your test method and @Before/@After callbacks, rolling back at the end. It works by default, it's enough to have some transaction manager in the context.

From: 10.3.5.4 Transaction management (bold mine):

In the TestContext framework, transactions are managed by the TransactionalTestExecutionListener. Note that TransactionalTestExecutionListener is configured by default, even if you do not explicitly declare @TestExecutionListeners on your test class. To enable support for transactions, however, you must provide a PlatformTransactionManager bean in the application context loaded by @ContextConfiguration semantics. In addition, you must declare @Transactional either at the class or method level for your tests.

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well, I tried this before, and it still doesn't work, maybe ... can the problem be that I didn't define the PlatformTransactionManager, how can I do that? –  Ján Vorčák Sep 27 '12 at 17:23
    
@javo: how are you modifying the database? If you are using Jpa/Hibernate/JdbcTemplate/... there must be some PlatformTransactionManager. Otherwise how Spring will know about your transactions and database? –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Sep 27 '12 at 17:29

The answers mentioning adding @Transactional are correct, but for simplicity you could just have your test class extends AbstractTransactionalJUnit4SpringContextTests.

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You need to run your test with a sprint context and a transaction manager, e.g.,

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)  
@ContextConfiguration(locations = {"/your-applicationContext.xml"})
@TransactionConfiguration(transactionManager="txMgr")
public class StudentSystemTest {

     @Test
     public void testTransactionalService() {
         // test transactional service
     }

     @Test
     @Transactional
     public void testNonTransactionalService() {
         // test non-transactional service
     }
}

See chapter 10. Testing of the Spring reference for further details.

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