Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a couple of functions I created a while ago for reading and writing std::strings to a FILE* opened for reading in binary mode. They have worked fine before (and WriteString() still works) but ReadString() keeps giving me memory corruption errors at run-time. The strings are stored by writing their size as an unsigned int before the string data as char.

bool WriteString(std::string t_str, FILE* t_fp) {
// Does the file stream exist and is it valid? If not, return false.
if (t_fp == NULL) return false;
// Create char pointer from string.
char* text = const_cast<char*>(t_str.c_str());
// Find the length of the string.
unsigned int size = t_str.size();
// Write the string's size to the file.
fwrite(&size, sizeof(unsigned int), 1, t_fp);
// Followed by the string itself.
fwrite(text, 1, size, t_fp);
// Everything worked, so return true.
return true;

}



std::string ReadString(FILE* t_fp) {
// Does the file stream exist and is it valid? If not, return false.
if (t_fp == NULL) return false;
// Create new string object to store the retrieved text and to return to the calling function.
std::string str;
// Create a char pointer for temporary storage.
char* text = new char;
// UInt for storing the string's size.
unsigned int size;
// Read the size of the string from the file and store it in size.
fread(&size, sizeof(unsigned int), 1, t_fp);
// Read [size] number of characters from the string and store them in text.
fread(text, 1, size, t_fp);
// Store the contents of text in str.
str = text;
// Resize str to match the size else we get extra cruft (line endings methinks).
str.resize(size);
// Finally, return the string to the calling function.
return str;

}

Can anyone see any problems with this code or have any alternative suggestions?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Biggest major problem that jumped out at me:

// Create a char pointer for temporary storage.
char* text = new char;
// ...
// Read [size] number of characters from the string and store them in text.
fread(text, 1, size, t_fp);

This creates text as a pointer to a single character, and then you try to read an arbitrary number of characters (potentially many more than one) into it. In order for this to work right, you would have to create text as an array of characters after you figured out what the size was, like this:

// UInt for storing the string's size.
unsigned int size;
// Read the size of the string from the file and store it in size.
fread(&size, sizeof(unsigned int), 1, t_fp);
// Create a char pointer for temporary storage.
char* text = new char[size];
// Read [size] number of characters from the string and store them in text.
fread(text, 1, size, t_fp);

Second, you don't free the memory that you allocated to text. You need to do that:

// Free the temporary storage
delete[] text;

Finally, is there a good reason why you are choosing to use C file I/O in C++? Using C++-style iostreams would have alleviated all of this and made your code much, much shorter and more readable.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. The reason I am using C file IO is simply because I originally wrote these functions when I was quite new to C++ and I didn't quite understand all the iostream stuff. I am still using these functions just because of some old code which uses them (which I intend to replace soon anyway). –  Tom Savage Aug 11 '09 at 20:39

The problem is:

char* text = new char;

you're allocating a single character. Do the allocation after you know size, and allocate all the size characters you need (e.g. with a new char[size]). (To avoid a leak, del it later after copying it, of course).

share|improve this answer

I'm sorry but the chosen answer doesn't work for me.

// UInt for storing the string's size.
unsigned int size;
// Read the size of the string from the file and store it in size.
fread(&size, sizeof(unsigned int), 1, t_fp);
// Create a char pointer for temporary storage.
char* text = new char[size];
// Read [size] number of characters from the string and store them in text.
fread(text, 1, size, t_fp);

The size ends up being a very large number. Am I missing something?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.