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For my computing A-Level task we have been split into groups to write a code in python to simulate a ceasar alphabet encryption, which shifts the alphabet by a certain value inputted by the user. Here's what we've come up with so far and we're really confused on what to do next :S

UPDATE* ok now i've made some changes and tried to understand the functions, now what do i have to add to this, also what value do i add +1 to to change the shift value here the current code i have

shift = raw_input ("Enter a value to shift the alphabet by... ")

alphaDict = {}

alphaList = ['a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z']

for shift in alphaList:

    alphaList.append (alphaDict)

alphaDict = 'a'

alphaDict = chr(ord( What value would go here? + 1)
share|improve this question
    
Someone recently asked a similar question, and some example code was given in response. –  Noctis Skytower Sep 27 '12 at 19:02
    
Why are you appending the alphaDict 26 times to the alphaList? –  André Caron Sep 27 '12 at 19:11
    
Well, if it were just for ROT-13... –  brandizzi Sep 28 '12 at 11:22

4 Answers 4

  • letters = letters + shift doesn't work. It doesn't write back to alpha list.
  • Check out the ord() and chr() functions:

     letter = "A"
     letter = chr(ord(letter) + 1)
     # letter is now "B"
    
share|improve this answer
    
Ok so now this is what i have now, do i have to put the alphabet into alphaDict for it to work?? –  user1655562 Sep 27 '12 at 18:17
    
shift = raw_input ("Enter a value to shift the alphabet... ") alphaDict = {} alphaList = [] letter = 'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t',‌​'u','v','w','x','y','z' for letter in letter: alphaList.append(letter) for letter in alphaList: letter = "a" letter = chr(ord(letter) + 1) –  user1655562 Sep 27 '12 at 18:18
    
No you don't. The code i posted is independent from yours. However, it doesn't properly work with "Z" as input, you might want to check that edge case. –  Markus Unterwaditzer Sep 27 '12 at 18:19
    
Sorry, what do you mean by edge case, noob over here lol –  user1655562 Sep 27 '12 at 18:21
    
Wikipedia says, "An edge case is a problem or situation that occurs only at an extreme (maximum or minimum) operating parameter". In this case, Markus' technique works for all letters except the final one, 'Z'. –  Kevin Sep 27 '12 at 18:23
def caesar(s, k, decode = False):
    if decode: k = 26 - k
    return "".join([chr((ord(i) - 65 + k) % 26 + 65)
                for i in s.upper()
                if ord(i) >= 65 and ord(i) <= 90 ])

msg = "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs"
print msg
enc = caesar(msg, 11)
print enc
print caesar(enc, 11, decode = True)

Code example from Rosetta Code. See: Caesar cipher - Python

share|improve this answer

Perhaps a more pythonic way is to use the string translate method:

import string # import library                                                                                                            

try:
    shift = int(raw_input ('Enter a value to shift the alphabet by... ')) # set amount of shift
except ValueError: # if an integer is not entered
    print 'You must enter an integer!'
table = string.maketrans(string.lowercase, string.lowercase[shift:]+string.lowercase[:shift]) # make a translation table from abc...xyz shifted letters
text = raw_input('Enter Text: ') # get input
print text.translate(table); # print translation

Or in the case where you simply want to translate the alphabet:

import string # import library                                                                                                            

try:
    shift = int(raw_input ('Enter a value to shift the alphabet by... ')) # set amount of shift
except ValueError: # if an integer is not entered
    print 'You must enter an integer!'
table = string.maketrans(string.lowercase, string.lowercase[shift:]+string.lowercase[:shift]) # make a translation table from abc...xyz shifted letters
print text.translate(string.lowercase); # print translation

If you're not worried about wrong input you can remove the try/except lines. Documentation here: http://docs.python.org/library/string.html#string.maketrans

share|improve this answer

Here is a way to do it without mapping all the characters:

print "Enter senctence: "
sentence = raw_input()
print "Enter shift: "
shift = raw_input()
result = ""
for letter in sentence:
  ascii = (ord(letter) + int(shift))%123
  if ascii < 97:
    ascii = ascii + 97
  result = result + chr(ascii)

print result
share|improve this answer
    
Wow thanks, however our teacher doesn't want us to use the print function so i will take it out and change it –  user1655562 Sep 27 '12 at 19:09

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