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I know that values sent to a function are by default passed as value and the method receives a copy of the variable. I know that when a variable is passed by reference the method can change the value of the variables from it was called. That being said, can someone help explain what's going on in these simple illustrations? thanks in advance. Are expressions passed by reference, I guess?

using System;
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int x = 2;
        int y = 20;
        Console.WriteLine(Add(x, y));
    }

    static int Add(int x, int y)
    {
        int ans = x + y;
         x = 20;
         y = 40;
       // return x+y;
         return ans;
        //returns 22
    }
}

and then

using System;
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int x = 2;
        int y = 20;
        Console.WriteLine(Add(x, y));
    }

    static int Add(int x, int y)
    {
        int ans = x + y;
         x = 20;
         y = 40;
       return x+y;
      //   return ans;
        //returns 60
    }
}
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1  
so your question is are expressions passed by reference.. A big NO –  Anirudha Sep 27 '12 at 18:16

9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Both of these illustrate pass by value, and in general, value type semantics.

In your first example, you are saying:

int ans = x + y;

This evaluates x and y at that time and adds them together to store in ans, setting x and y to new values later does not affect the value of ans.

Consider it this way:

static int Add(int x, int y)
{
    int ans = x + y;  // evaluates ans = x + y = 2 + 20 = 22
     x = 20;          // here ans = 22, x = 20, y = 20
     y = 40;          // here ans = 22, x = 20, y = 40
     return ans;      // returns ans which is still 22 since x & y are independent
}

In your second example, you are delaying the addition till after you set the new values, thus the new values of x and y are used in the computation of

return x + y;

So, in essence, you get:

static int Add(int x, int y)
{
    int ans = x + y;  // ans = 22, x = 2, y = 20
     x = 20;          // ans = 22, x = 20, y = 20
     y = 40;          // ans = 22, x = 20, y = 40
   return x+y;        // evaluates x + y = 60
}

I think what may be confusing you is that:

ans = x + y;

Is not a function, it's an expression which is evaluated and returned, changing x or y after this statement executes does not affect ans again.

The key point to remember, again, is that ans = x + y; evaluates x and y at the time that statement is executed. Further changes to x and y don't come into play here.

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I guess he wants to ask are expressions passed by reference...I guess u should add some info about rvalue and lvalue –  Anirudha Sep 27 '12 at 18:18
1  
if you actually wanted to mimic the "expression as a reference" I think it would be easier to define a lambda at the start and then invoke it at the end. –  Servy Sep 27 '12 at 18:19
    
True, that's another way to attack it, but at that point it's roughly the same as a method, of sorts. –  James Michael Hare Sep 27 '12 at 18:20
    
i figured this question would get slammed due to its simplicity, but it was hard for me to understand why i was getting different answers. thanks. –  wootscootinboogie Sep 27 '12 at 18:36

There is nothing strange going on, and nothing that has anything with how parameters are passed.

In the first example:

// parameters in: x = 2, y = 20.
int ans = x + y;
// now ans contains the value 22.
x = 20;
y = 40;
// now x and y has changed, but the value in ans
// is already calculated and doesn't change.
return ans;
// returns 22;

In the second example:

// parameters in: x = 2, y = 20.
int ans = x + y;
// now ans contains the value 22.
x = 20;
y = 40;
// now x and y has changed, but not ans.
return x+y;
// the value of the expression is calculated with the current
// values, and 60 is returned.
// the variable ans still contains 22, but that isn't used here.
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Well, it doesn't have nothing to do with how parameters are passed. If the + operator took integers as a reference and returned a reference to an integer rather than an integer, it would be another story, but that's not even possible in C# (without fairly significant changes). –  Servy Sep 27 '12 at 18:47

The only real difference between the two is that your return statement in the first is returning the value held at the memory location identified by ans which holds the value of 22.

In the second, the return statement is returning the value of the current value at the memory location identified by x plus the current value at the memory location identified by y, which are local to that method (pass by value) and were changed by you to 20 and 40, respectively. That value, is, of course, 60.

The important piece to note that pass-by-value means that local stack memory (or whatever) is allocated for the values x and y and do not reference the values x andy` from the caller's method.

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In the first case Add returns x + y. In the second case Add returns 20 + 40;

When you assign a value within the function, you change your local copy of the variable. Not the actual value.

For example:

using System;
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int x = 2;
        int y = 20;
        Console.WriteLine(Add(x, y));
        // x is still 2, y is still 20
    }

    static int Add(int x, int y)
    {
        int ans = x + y;
        // You calculate the parameters and store it in the local variable
        x = 20;
        y = 40;
        // You've adapted your local COPIES of the variables
        return ans;
        // You return the answer which was calculated earlier
    }
}

However, this is because you're dealing with a value type (struct). If you're dealing with reference types (class) then it's another matter, for example:

using System;
class Program
{
    private class Numbers
    {
        public int X;
        public int Y;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Numbers num = new Numbers();
        num.x = 2;
        num.y = 20;
        Console.WriteLine(Add(num)); // Prints 2 + 20 = 22
        // num.x is now 20, and num.y is now 40
        Console.WriteLine(Add(num)); // Prints 20 + 40 = 60
    }

    static int Add(Numbers num)
    {
        int ans = num.x + num.y;
        // You calculate the result from the public variables of the class
        num.x = 20;
        num.y = 40;
        // You change the values of the class
        return ans;
        // You return the answer which was calculated earlier
    }
}

In C# there are 4 "types" of passing parameters:

  • Passing a value type (struct) by value.
  • Passing a reference type (class) by value.
  • Passing a value type by reference.
  • Passing a reference type by reference.

Short example that demonstrates these 4:

static void Main()
{
    int x = 5; // Value type
    List<int> list = new List<int>(new [] { 1, 2, 3 }); // Reference type

    ValueByValue(x); // x is still 5
    ReferenceByValue(list) // list still contains { 1, 2, 3 }
    ValueByReference(ref x); // x is now 10
    ReferenceByReference(ref list); // list is now a new list containing only { 4, 5, 6 }
}

static void ValueByValue(int x)
{
    x = 10; // Changes local COPY of x
}

static void ReferenceByValue(List<int> list)
{
    list = new List<int>(new [] { 4, 5, 6 }); // Changes local COPY of list
}

static void ValueByReference(ref int x)
{
    x = 10; // Changes the actual x variable in the Main method
}

static void ReferenceByReference(ref List<int> list)
{
    list = new List<int>(new [] { 4, 5, 6 }); // Changes the actual list in the Main method
}
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An expression always yields an RVALUE..

An Example would help

int x=50,y=20;

->RVALUE

you cant assign anything to rvalue.

Example 
x+y=500;//INVALID

->LVALUE

you can assign values to it.

Example
x=500;//VALID
y=545*33+4;//VALID

So,expressions can never be passed by reference

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In both the cases, it is passed by value.

But in the second case if you try to print the value of x and y in the calling function, it will return x=2 and y=20 only.

x=20 and y=40 just changed in the add function for the second case, they dont return back modified to the caller.

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Here parameters are passing by value. Its just that in the 2nd example since x and y are modified to 20 and 40 respectively so 60 is return as a sum of the two.

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 static int Add(int x, int y) 
 { 
      int ans = x + y; 
      x = 20; 
      y = 40; 
      // return x+y; 
      return ans; 
      //returns 22 
 }

In this method, the calculation is conducted before the modification, and hence stored before the variables are changed.

 static int Add(int x, int y) 
 { 
      int ans = x + y; 
      x = 20; 
      y = 40; 
      return x+y; 
      // return ans; 
      //returns 60 
 }

In this method, the ans variable is not used, the x and y values are changed, then you are returning the mathematical result of x + y, and not ans.

Also, none of either of those methods are pass by reference, they are both pass by value, pass by reference methods have the ref keyword infront of the parameter.

 static int Add(ref int x, int y) // x is the referenced variable in this example
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No this expressions are not call by reference its only call by value. Call by reference changes the value of arguments mean you are passing reference of variable.

Example :

using System;
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int x = 2;
        int y = 20;


        Console.WriteLine("SUM  :: " + AddByValue(x, y));  // Call by value
        Console.WriteLine("X :: " + x + ", Y :: " + y);  // Nothing change to variable

        Console.WriteLine("SUM  :: " + AddByRef(ref x, ref y));  // Call by reference
        Console.WriteLine("X :: " + x + ", Y :: " + y);  // Value changed

    }

    static int AddByValue(int x, int y)
    {
        int ans = x + y;
         x = 20;
         y = 40;
       return ans;
    }

    static int AddByRef(ref int x, ref int y)
    {
        int ans = x + y;
        x = 20;
        y = 40;
       return ans;
    }


}

Output :

SUM  :: 60
X :: 2, Y :: 20

SUM  :: 60
X :: 20, Y :: 40
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