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To my amazement I just discovered that the C99 stdint.h is missing from MS Visual Studio 2003 upwards. I'm sure they have their reasons, but does anyone know where I can download a copy? Without this header I have no definitions for useful types such as uint32_t, etc.

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29  
As an update to this: MSVC 2010 now includes stdint.h –  Michael Burr Nov 24 '10 at 3:12
3  
As well as <cstdint>. –  Adrian McCarthy Sep 12 '12 at 16:46
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8 Answers 8

up vote 59 down vote accepted

Turns out you can download a MS version of this header from:

http://msinttypes.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/stdint.h

A portable one can be found here:

http://www.azillionmonkeys.com/qed/pstdint.h

Thanks to the Software Ramblings blog.

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A public domain (not an MIT/BSD license - you don't even need to keep a copyright attribution around) stdint.h for MSVC (a slightly modified version from MinGW): snipplr.com/view/18199/stdinth –  Michael Burr Oct 23 '09 at 7:32
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Just define them yourself.

#ifdef _MSC_VER

typedef __int32 int32_t;
typedef unsigned __int32 uint32_t;
typedef __int64 int64_t;
typedef unsigned __int64 uint64_t;

#else
#include <stdint.h>
#endif
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3  
Am I missing something or shouldn't it be typedef unsigned __int64 uint64_t; ? –  Roman A. Taycher Dec 5 '10 at 8:55
    
@Roman A. Taycher: Edited to change __int32 to __int64. –  Craig McQueen Dec 22 '10 at 10:48
7  
You seem to be, uh, missing a few... –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Nov 8 '12 at 18:21
    
And to use literal uint64_t values it is useful to #define U64(u) (u##ui64) on Windows and to #define U64(u) (u##ULL) otherwise. –  Niklas Aug 14 '13 at 11:12
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Update: Visual Studio 2010 and Visual C++ 2010 Express both have stdint.h. It can be found in C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\include

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1  
As well as <cstdint> for C++ users who like it in std::. –  Adrian McCarthy Sep 12 '12 at 16:45
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Visual Studio 2003 - 2008 (Visual C++ 7.1 - 9) don't claim to be C99 compatible. (Thanks to rdentato for his comment.)

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Boost contains cstdint.hpp header file with the types you are looking for: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_36_0/boost/cstdint.hpp

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boost is C++, the question is on C99 –  Remo.D Sep 24 '08 at 14:11
3  
It is not clear - he is asking about a C99 header in Visual Studio, without specifying which language he is using. In any case it can't be C99 because Microsoft does not support it. –  Nemanja Trifunovic Sep 24 '08 at 14:36
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Microsoft do not support C99 and haven't announced any plans to. I believe they intend to track C++ standards but consider C as effectively obsolete except as a subset of C++.

New projects in Visual Studio 2003 and later have the "Compile as C++ Code (/TP)" option set by default, so any .c files will be compiled as C++.

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Another portable solution:

POSH: The Portable Open Source Harness

"POSH is a simple, portable, easy-to-use, easy-to-integrate, flexible, open source "harness" designed to make writing cross-platform libraries and applications significantly less tedious to create and port."

http://poshlib.hookatooka.com/poshlib/trac.cgi

as described and used in the book: Write portable code: an introduction to developing software for multiple platforms By Brian Hook http://books.google.ca/books?id=4VOKcEAPPO0C

-Jason

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link Authorization Required –  CiNN Oct 17 '09 at 20:41
    
From Poshlib Wikipedia article, the link authorization is:username: guest, password: guest123 –  JPaget Sep 13 '12 at 23:19
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I solved this problem by copying the file from VS2010 to the project folder

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