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If we subclass UIView and in any of this new class's instance methods, do

[self removeFromSuperview];

[foo someMessage];
_a = _a + 1;
self.b++;
for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; i++) {
    self.b++;
    //NSLog(@"b is %i", self.b);
}

What will happen? Assuming the super view is the only one claiming ownership of this view, will self be deallocated right away?

The first line is sending a local variable foo referencing an external object the message someMessage. The second line is a local variable _b. The third line is a property b. And the next few lines are just make making some delay.

Trying on Xcode 4.5 and iPhone 5 (iOS 6), the code actually runs without crashing. The code was done inside of -touchesBegan. The view will disappear on screen only after the big delay loop has finished, probably due to the main loop now calling drawRect for rootViewController.view and show that the view has disappeared (the view has disappeared from the view hierarchy before the delay loop, but just not reflected on screen yet).

If I make the loop only count to 1000 or 10000, and use the NSLog inside that loop, the number actually prints out nicely without any crash. Update: it is said that the object may still be accessible for a short while, but it seems that even for 30 seconds or a minute, the code still run without any problem.

So how does this work? If using Instruments, I actually see that this FooView object went away from the "allocation" table only after the big delay loop. So it is strange that it seems that the FooView object wasn't dealloc'ed until later, not at the point of removeFromSuperView.

I also had a [self.presentingViewController dismissViewControllerAnimated ...] that dismissed self, and then the next line, self.presentingViewController is used again, self.presentingViewController became nil, but if I also add a loop to increment an integer property for 10000 and print it out using NSLog, it printed out nicely too.

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1 Answer 1

Assuming the super view is the only one claiming ownership of this view, will self be deallocated right away?

Yes, probably, but the memory doesn't actually get reused or cleared; you can often still get at what appears to be a valid object if nothing much else has happened after deallocation.

Try:

[self removeFromSuperview];
[self performSelector:@selector(tryToCrash) withObject:nil afterDelay:0.1];

//...

- (void)tryToCrash
{
    [foo someMessage];
    _a = _a + 1;
    self.b++;
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; i++) {
        self.b++;
        //NSLog(@"i is %i", self.i);
    }
}

which will schedule that code to occur after the next go-around of the run loop, and you might see a crash. The main thing is that you're using an object which you know to be dead, which isn't quite to the level of C's UB, but is certainly not guaranteed to give you any particular results.

The view will disappear on screen only after the big delay loop has finished, probably due to the main loop now calling drawRect

Right, views are only redrawn once each pass through the run loop, and only if they're marked as needing it. The superview will be so marked since one of its subviews has been removed. It is also possible that it defers actually releasing the subview until this point.

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If you have a dangling pointer, accessing it will still crash even if the memory hasn't been reused yet. –  Carl Veazey Sep 27 '12 at 19:13
    
@Carl: Sending a message won't. NSNumber * n = [[NSNumber alloc] initWithInteger:10]; [n release]; NSLog(@"%f", [n floatValue]); –  Josh Caswell Sep 27 '12 at 19:16
1  
Wow. NSNumber is a bad example of that because of its various optimizations, but a simple NSObject subclass will still respond to messages right after deallocation and won't crash at least until something else is done to change the heap, but then not 100% chance. It does make a lot of sense now that I think about it. Thanks for enlightening me! –  Carl Veazey Sep 27 '12 at 20:16

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