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I have following example code:

@interface S1 : NSObject
{
    void(*fn_)();
}
@end
@implementation S1
- (void) set:(BOOL)f
{
    if (f)
    {
        struct A { static void f() { std::cout << "1" << std::endl; } };
        fn_ = A::f;
    }
    else
    {
        struct A { static void f() { std::cout << "2" << std::endl; } };
        fn_ = A::f;
    }
}
- (void) test { fn_(); }
@end

struct S2
{
    void set(BOOL f)
    {
        if (f)
        {
            struct A { static void f() { std::cout << "1" << std::endl; } };
            fn_ = A::f;
        }
        else
        {
            struct A { static void f() { std::cout << "2" << std::endl; } };
            fn_ = A::f;
        }
    }
    void test() { fn_(); }
    void(*fn_)();
};

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    auto s1 = [[S1 alloc] init];
    [s1 set:TRUE];
    [s1 test];
    [s1 set:FALSE];
    [s1 test];

    S2 s2;
    s2.set(TRUE);
    s2.test();
    s2.set(FALSE);
    s2.test();

    return 0;
}

It prints

1
1
1
2

but I expecting

1
2
1
2

If I change name of second struct to different (e. g. "B"), always works as expected.

No warnings appears, so it's hard to find why your program doesn't work properly.

Is that my ignorance or llvm's bug?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It would indeed appear to be a clang bug. (with the caveat that there is no standard specifying the Objective-C++ language, so what is "correct" is a little bit up in the air)

If instead of compiling to executable code, I generate LLVM IR, using a command like this

clang -g -std=c++11  -Wall -Wextra localstruct.mm  -emit-llvm -S

the -set: method compiles down to this, with what would appear to be the two function pointer assignment lines highlighted:

define internal void @"\01-[S1 set:]"(%0* %self, i8* %_cmd, i8 signext %f) uwtable ssp {
  %1 = alloca %0*, align 8
  %2 = alloca i8*, align 8
  %3 = alloca i8, align 1
  store %0* %self, %0** %1, align 8
  call void @llvm.dbg.declare(metadata !{%0** %1}, metadata !1490), !dbg !1491
  store i8* %_cmd, i8** %2, align 8
  call void @llvm.dbg.declare(metadata !{i8** %2}, metadata !1492), !dbg !1491
  store i8 %f, i8* %3, align 1
  call void @llvm.dbg.declare(metadata !{i8* %3}, metadata !1493), !dbg !1494
  %4 = load i8* %3, align 1, !dbg !1495
  %5 = icmp ne i8 %4, 0, !dbg !1495
  br i1 %5, label %6, label %12, !dbg !1495

; <label>:6                                       ; preds = %0
  %7 = load %0** %1, align 8, !dbg !1497
  %8 = load i64* @"OBJC_IVAR_$_S1.fn_", !dbg !1497, !invariant.load !1499
  %9 = bitcast %0* %7 to i8*, !dbg !1497
  %10 = getelementptr inbounds i8* %9, i64 %8, !dbg !1497
  %11 = bitcast i8* %10 to void ()**, !dbg !1497

store void ()* @"_ZN10-[S1 set:]1A1fEv", void ()** %11, align 8, !dbg !1497

  br label %18, !dbg !1500

; <label>:12                                      ; preds = %0
  %13 = load %0** %1, align 8, !dbg !1501
  %14 = load i64* @"OBJC_IVAR_$_S1.fn_", !dbg !1501, !invariant.load !1499
  %15 = bitcast %0* %13 to i8*, !dbg !1501
  %16 = getelementptr inbounds i8* %15, i64 %14, !dbg !1501
  %17 = bitcast i8* %16 to void ()**, !dbg !1501

store void ()* @"_ZN10-[S1 set:]1A1fEv", void ()** %17, align 8, !dbg !1501

  br label %18

; <label>:18                                      ; preds = %12, %6
  ret void, !dbg !1503
}

Both cases appear to reference the same function symbol _ZN10-[S1 set:]1A1fEv. If you look at the corresponding code for the method in the struct, it references two: _ZZN2S23setEaEN1A1fEv and _ZZN2S23setEaEN1A1fE_0v.

FWIW, GCC's Objective-C++ compiler produces the desired result. Please do report the bug to the clang project and don't just work around the problem in your code.

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Great, thank you. I just using different names yet, but I'll post this bug. –  Igor Bulgakov Oct 31 '12 at 6:34

That code looks an awful lot like you are assigning an instance variable to point to the contents of a struct that is actually on the stack.

You are seeing the output you are only by coincidence; it'd likely crash with optimization turned on and/or any kind of function call complexity thrown in.

Just a guess -- my C++ is a bit rusty.

share|improve this answer
    
Where do you see I instantiate that structs? I initializing instance variable with static method, it is just global function and isn't depending on instance of that struct. This code is just example to show problem, much more complex code works properly if structs have different names. –  Igor Bulgakov Sep 27 '12 at 21:42
    
Like I said -- just a guess based on prior observances. It might legitimately be a compiler bug. –  bbum Sep 27 '12 at 23:38

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