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i have a code like this:

int i = 123;
char myString[100];
strcpy(myString, "my text");

and how i want to add the 123 after "my text". how to do this in c/c++?

at the end myString sould be my test123

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3  
Is this C or C++? –  chris Sep 27 '12 at 19:53
2  
C and C++ are two different languages. They way you would do this in C is completely different from how you'd do it in C++. –  Adam Rosenfield Sep 27 '12 at 19:55
    
If C++, have a look at this: stackoverflow.com/questions/5590381/… –  chris Sep 27 '12 at 19:56
    
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

(To complement Luchian's answer)

In C:

char myString[128];
int i = 123;
snprintf(myString, sizeof(myString), "My Text %d", i);
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2  
Note: this only works if myString is an array. If it's a pointer instead, you must keep track of the length of the pointed-to buffer and pass that in as the second argument of snprintf, since sizeof(pointer) is not what you want (it's typically 4 or 8 bytes). –  Adam Rosenfield Sep 27 '12 at 20:02
    
@AdamRosenfield I'm aware of that. See the edited answer :) –  user529758 Sep 27 '12 at 20:04
    
Yeah, I was just adding clarification in case anyone came by and decided to copy+paste the code without fully understanding it. –  Adam Rosenfield Sep 27 '12 at 20:57
    
@AdamRosenfield valid reason, absolutely. (NO ONE should copy-paste code without understanding it though, right?) –  user529758 Sep 27 '12 at 21:03
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In C++:

std::stringstream ss;
ss << "my text" << i;
std::string resultingString = ss.str();

There's no such thing as C/C++.

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In C++11:

std::string result = "my text" + std::to_string(i);
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Assuming mystring is large enough, which it is in this example:

sprintf( myString, "my text%d", 123 );
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1  
Sorry, man, but -1 for not using snprintf(). You should really be secure. –  user529758 Sep 27 '12 at 19:56
1  
Heh, H2CO3 is right, use his form ;-) –  Mark Stevens Sep 27 '12 at 19:59
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With the Qt QString object in C++:

std::cout << QString("my text %1").arg(123456);
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