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Hi I have a doubt about programming in CUDA. I have the following code:

int main () {

    for (;;) {
        kernel_1 (x1, x2, ....);
        kernel_2 (x1, x2 ...);
        kernel_3_Reduction (x1);

    // code manipulation host_x1
    // Copy the pointer device to host
        cpy (host_x1, x1, DeviceToHost)
        cpu_code_x1_manipulation;
        kernel_ (x1, x2, ....);
    }

}

So when the copies made ​​and how do I ensure that kernel_1, kernel_2 kernel_3 and completed their tasks?

share|improve this question
    
unless you use streams and some other constructs, all of your cuda calls (kernels, cudamemCpy, etc.) will be issued in the default stream and they will be blocking (will not begin until previous cuda calls complete). As long as you don't switch streams, cudaMemcpy will not return control to the CPU thread until it is complete. Likewise, the cudaMemcpy will not commence until all previous cuda calls are complete. – Robert Crovella Sep 27 '12 at 20:01

All operations launched on the same stream are synchronized. In the code above, all kernels will run one after another. You will have to explicitly specify streams if you need kernel_1 and kernel_2 run in parallel.

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2  
It should be noted that concurrent execution of kernels is not supported by all CUDA devices. Of course if there are multiple CUDA devices present, they can run kernels in parallel. – datenwolf Sep 27 '12 at 20:33
1  
I believe, on Fermi and later architectures with CC 2.x and higher, it is possible to actually launch upto 16 concurrent kernels on a single GPU device. developer.download.nvidia.com/CUDA/training/… – Recker Sep 28 '12 at 5:02
    
I would like to implement the kernel_1, kernel_2 kernel and 3 one after the other, ie the CPU stay stopped until the completion of the execution of kernels – user1704397 Sep 28 '12 at 16:33
    
@user1704397 the code above will do just that, except the CPU will not wait for the work completion. Use cudaDeviceSynchronize() after third kernel invocation to wait for work completion, as ahmad suggested in another answer. – Eugene Sep 28 '12 at 16:47

Use cudaDeviceSynchronize(); just where you want to ensure all kernels are done. After this command, you can assume all kernels and all pending device function calls are done.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply! So when the reduction is performed kernel_3_reduction (x1), the result is not expected. Apparently calculations made in kernel_1 and kernel_2 not been completed. To make sure that the kernel_1 kernel_2 have been completed and I use: kernel_1 (); cudaDeviceSynchronize (); kernel_2 (); cudaDeviceSynchronize (); kernel_3_reduction (); cudaDeviceSynchronize (); cpy (host_x1, x1, DeviceToHost) cpu_code_x1_manipulation; kernel_4 (x1, x2, ....); cudaDeviceSynchronize (); – user1704397 Sep 28 '12 at 16:29
    
I would like to implement the kernel_1, kernel_2 kernel and 3 one after the other, ie the CPU stay stopped until the completion of the execution of kernels – user1704397 Sep 28 '12 at 16:34
    
Yeap, It is OK! – ahmad Sep 28 '12 at 17:44

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