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I have template class ItemContainer that actually is facade for a whole family of containers with different capabilities like sorting, indexing, grouping etc.

Implementation details are hidden in cpp. file using pimpl idiom and explicit instantiation. Template is instantiated only with well-known limited set of implementation classes that define the actual behavior of container.

Main template implements common functions supported by all containers - IsEmpty(), GetCount(), Clear() etc.

Each specific container specializes some functions that are supported only by it, e.g. Sort() for sorted container, operator[Key&] for key indexed container etc.

The reason for such design is that class is replacement for several legacy hand-made bicycle containers written by some prehistorics in early 90th. Idea is to replace old rotting implemenation with modern STL&Boost containers keeping old interface untouched as much as possible.

The problem

Such design leads to unpleasant situation when user tries to call unsupported function from some specialization. It compiles OK, but produces error on linking stage (symbol not defined). Not very user friendly behavior.

Example:

 SortedItemContainer sc;
 sc.IsEmpty(); // OK
 sc.Sort(); // OK

 IndexedItemContainer ic;
 ic.IsEmpty(); // OK
 ic.Sort(); // Compiles OK, but linking fails

Of course, it could be completely avoided by using inheritance instead of specialization but I don't like to produce a lot of classes with 1-3 functions. Would like to keep original design.

Is there possibility to turn it into compile stage error instead of link stage one? I have a feeling that static assert could be used somehow.

Target compiler for this code is VS2008, so practical solution must be C++03 compatible and could use MS specific features. But portable C++11 solutions also are welcome.

Source Code:

// ItemContainer.h
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

template <class Impl> class ItemContainer
{
public:

   // Common functions supported by all specializations
   void Clear();
   bool IsEmpty() const;
   ...

   // Functions supported by sequenced specializations only
   ItemPtr operator[](size_t i_index) const; 
   ...

   // Functions supported by indexed specializations only
   ItemPtr operator[](const PrimaryKey& i_key) const;
   ...

   // Functions supported by sorted specializations only
   void Sort();
   ...

private:

   boost::scoped_ptr<Impl> m_data; ///< Internal container implementation

}; // class ItemContainer

// Forward declarations for pimpl classes, they are defined in ItemContainer.cpp
struct SequencedImpl;
struct IndexedImpl;
struct SortedImpl;

// Typedefs for specializations that are explicitly instantiated
typedef ItemContainer<SequencedImpl> SequencedItemContainer;
typedef ItemContainer<IndexedImpl> IndexedItemContainer;
typedef ItemContainer<SortedImpl> SortedItemContainer;

// ItemContainer.cpp
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

// Implementation classes definition, skipped as non-relevant
struct SequencedImpl { ... };
struct IndexedImpl { ... };
struct SortedImpl { ... };

// Explicit instantiation of members of SequencedItemContainer
template  void SequencedItemContainer::Clear(); // Common
template  bool SequencedItemContainer::IsEmpty() const; // Common
template  ItemPtr SequencedItemContainer::operator[](size_t i_index) const; // Specific

// Explicit instantiation of members of IndexedItemContainer
template  void IndexedItemContainer::Clear(); // Common
template  bool IndexedItemContainer::IsEmpty() const; // Common
template  ItemPtr IndexedItemContainer::operator[](const PrimaryKey& i_key) const; // Specific

// Explicit instantiation of members of SortedItemContainer
template  void SortedItemContainer::Clear(); // Common
template  bool SortedItemContainer::IsEmpty() const; // Common
template  void SortedItemContainer::Sort(); // Specific

// Common functions are implemented as main template members
template <class Impl> bool ItemContainer<Impl>::IsEmpty() const
{
   return m_data->empty(); // Just sample
}

// Specialized functions are implemented as specialized members (partial specialization)
template <> void SortedItemContaner::Sort()
{
   std::sort(m_data.begin(), m_data.end(), SortFunctor()); // Just sample
}

...
// etc
share|improve this question
2  
What problem are you trying to solve that isn't handled by the standard C++ way of separating algorithms from data? The problem appears to be a class that has too large of an interface. –  Mark B Sep 27 '12 at 20:11
2  
@MarkB The problem is interface with about 10 common and specialized functions that doesn't worth to split into 5 interfaces with 1-2 functions. I would like to not multiply such entities. –  Rost Sep 27 '12 at 20:32
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4 Answers

Consider this example:

class A {
public:
  void foo() {}
  void bar();
};

Only during linking phase it could be detected an error that A::bar() is not defined and this has nothing to do with templates.

You shall define separate interfaces for your different containers and use them for your implementations. Just one of the possibilities below:

template <class Impl> 
class ItemContainerImpl
{
public:
   ItemContainerImpl();
protected:
   boost::scoped_ptr<Impl> m_data; ///< Internal container implementation
};

// No operations
template <class Impl>
class Empty : protected virtual ItemContainerImpl<Impl> {};

template <class Impl, template <class> class Access, template <class> class Extra = Empty> 
class ItemContainer : public Extra<Impl>, public Access<Impl>
{
public:

   // Common functions supported by all specializations
   void Clear();
   bool IsEmpty() const;
   ...
};

template <class Impl>
class SequencedSpecialization : protected virtual ItemContainerImpl<Impl> {
public:
   // Functions supported by sequenced specializations only
   ItemPtr operator[](size_t i_index) const; 
   ...
};


template <class Impl>
class IndexedSpecialization : protected virtual ItemContainerImpl<Impl> {
public:
   // Functions supported by indexed specializations only
   ItemPtr operator[](const PrimaryKey& i_key) const;
   ...
};

template <class Impl>
class Sorted : protected virtual ItemContainerImpl<Impl> {
public:
   // Functions supported by sorted specializations only
   void Sort();
   ...
};

// Typedefs for specializations that are explicitly instantiated
typedef ItemContainer<SequencedImpl, SequencedSpecialization> SequencedItemContainer;
typedef ItemContainer<IndexedImpl, IndexedSpecialization> IndexedItemContainer;
typedef ItemContainer<SortedImpl, IndexedSpecialization, Sorted> SortedItemContainer;
share|improve this answer
    
Well, that's exactly what I'm trying to avoid - a lot of classes with 1-2 functions defined. –  Rost Sep 27 '12 at 20:39
    
See last 3 lines of my answer. I am using only one ItemContainer - the rest are just helper templates to make this works. The number of functions you have to define will not change. –  PiotrNycz Sep 27 '12 at 20:42
    
I understand this and considered such variant too. E.g. boost::multi_index uses similar approach. But hoping that more simple way exists. –  Rost Sep 27 '12 at 20:51
    
Anyway, take upvote for your time :-) –  Rost Sep 27 '12 at 20:53
    
Thanks, I have strong feeling that this approach could even reduce number of your lines of code. I believe (not sure) that you can define template classes functions in header. –  PiotrNycz Sep 27 '12 at 20:56
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If it is known at compile time that a certain function will not be implemented, then that function shouldn't have been declared in the first place. Otherwise, this is a programming error.

Having said that, you must avoid declaring such a function, or declare it such that the declaration only works if it will be implemented. That can be achieved either by a static_assert or by SFINAE. For example

template<class Container>   // you need one instantination per container supported
struct container_traits
{
   static const bool has_sort;  // define appropriately in instantinations
   /* etc */
};

template<class container>
class ContainerWrapper {

  unique_ptr<container> _m_container;

  template<bool sorting> typename std::enable_if< sorting>::type
  _m_sort()
  {
    _m_container->sort();
  }

  template<bool sorting> typename std::enable_if<!sorting>::type
  _m_sort()
  {
    static_assert(0,"sort not supported");
  }

public

  void sort()
  {
    _m_sort<container_traits<container>::has_sort>();
  }

  /* etc */

};
share|improve this answer
    
Aha, SFINAE. Forgot about it. Not very elegant, but it works. Thanks :-) –  Rost Sep 27 '12 at 21:49
    
Looks like this is the best match. I will accept it if nobody will propose something better today. Thanks! –  Rost Sep 28 '12 at 5:55
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What about this ?

template <class T, class supported_types> struct vec_enabler : 
  boost::mpl::contains<supported_types, T> {};

// adding Sort interface
template <class T, class enabler, class Enable = void>
struct sort_cap{};

template <class T, class enabler>
struct sort_cap<T, enabler, 
                typename boost::enable_if< typename enabler::type >::type>
{
  void Sort();
};

// adding operator[]
template <class T, class U, class R, class enabler, class Enable = void>
struct index_cap{};

template <class T, class primary_key, class ret, class enabler>
struct index_cap<T, primary_key, ret, enabler, 
                 typename boost::enable_if< typename enabler::type >::type>
{
  ret operator[](primary_key i_index) const;
};


template <class Impl> 
class ItemContainer : 
  public sort_cap<Impl, 
                  vec_enabler<Impl, boost::mpl::vector<A, B> > >, // sort for classes A or B
  public index_cap<Impl, size_t, ItemPtr, 
                   vec_enabler<Impl, boost::mpl::vector<C> > >, // index for class C
  public index_cap<Impl, primaryKey, ItemPtr, 
                   vec_enabler<Impl, boost::mpl::vector<B> > > // index for class B
{
public:
  void Clear();
  bool IsEmpty() const;
}; 

I find that using inheritance is the most clean way to achieve what you would like to do (which is 'adding interfaces to a class'.) Then we have the following:

int main(){
    ItemContainer<A> cA;
    cA.Sort();

    //ItemPtr p = cA[0]; // compile time error

    ItemContainer<C> cC;
    //cC.Sort(); // compile time error
    ItemPtr p = cC[0];
    //ItemPtr pp= cC[primaryKey()]; // compile time error
}

Of course, you still are able to write the implementation in .cpp files.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like you overcomplicated things a bit. I don't need different capabilities for different item types. Actually I ever don't have item type as container template parameter :-) –  Rost Oct 2 '12 at 10:25
    
Indeed, but you wanted the number of classes to be limited :) (so I factorized some code.) A, B and C should be replaced by SequencedImpl, IndexedImpl SortedImpl (but I did not get into the details of which class should implement what,) so there is no different capabilities for different item types. vec_enabler is something that answers true if type T is inside Seq, false otherwise, and is used for SFINAE. index_cap: the signature is the same for both accessors, so I used the same template. –  Raffi Oct 2 '12 at 12:23
    
Finally sort_cap<Impl, vec_enabler<Impl, boost::mpl::vector<A, B> > > adds sorting capabilities if Impl is either A or B (same for index_cap.) –  Raffi Oct 2 '12 at 12:25
    
Aha, got it. Thanks. –  Rost Oct 2 '12 at 12:50
    
You're welcome! –  Raffi Oct 2 '12 at 13:16
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Despite the good answers suggesting to use SFINAE, I continued to search solution that will meet my original design. And finally I found it.

The key idea is to use specialization for specific function members instead of explicit instantiation.

What was done:

  1. Added specific functions dummy implementation for main template. Implementations containing static asserts only were placed in header file but not inlined into class definition.
  2. Specific functions explicit instantiations were removed from .cpp file.
  3. Specific functions specialization declarations were added to header file.

Source Code:

// ItemContainer.h
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
template <class Impl> class ItemContainer
{
public:

   // Common functions supported by all specializations
   void Clear();
   bool IsEmpty() const;
   ...

   // Functions supported by sorted specializations only
   void Sort();
   ...

private:

   boost::scoped_ptr<Impl> m_data; ///< Internal container implementation

}; // class ItemContainer

// Dummy implementation of specialized function for main template
template <class Impl> void ItemContainer<Impl>::Sort()
{
   // This function is unsupported in calling specialization
   BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(false);
}

// Forward declarations for pimpl classes,
// they are defined in ItemContainer.cpp
struct SortedImpl;

// Typedefs for specializations that are explicitly instantiated
typedef ItemContainer<SortedImpl> SortedItemContainer;

// Forward declaration of specialized function member
template<> void CSortedOrderContainer::Sort();

// ItemContainer.cpp
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

// Implementation classes definition, skipped as non-relevant
struct SortedImpl { ... };

// Explicit instantiation of common members of SortedItemContainer
template  void SortedItemContainer::Clear();
template  bool SortedItemContainer::IsEmpty() const;

// Common functions are implemented as main template members
template <class Impl> bool ItemContainer<Impl>::IsEmpty() const
{
   return m_data->empty(); // Just sample
}

// Specialized functions are implemented as specialized members
// (partial specialization)
template <> void SortedItemContaner::Sort()
{
   std::sort(m_data.begin(), m_data.end(), SortFunctor()); // Just sample
}

...
// etc

This way it works at least for VS2008.

For GCC with C++11 static_assert usage requires some trick to enable lazy template function instatiation (compiled sample):

template <class T> struct X
{
    void f();
};

template<class T> void X<T>::f()
{
   // Could not just use static_assert(false) - it will not compile.
   // sizeof(T) == 0 is calculated only on template instantiation and       
   // doesn't produce immediate compilation error
   static_assert(sizeof(T) == 0, "Not implemented");
}

template<> void X<int>::f()
{
  std::cout << "X<int>::f() called" << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
   X<int> a;
   a.f(); // Compiles OK

   X<double> b;
   b.f(); // Compilation error - Not implemented!
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solution is in no way better (or worse) than a SFINAE solution. Both obtain the same goal: a compile time error. The static_assert produces a neater compiler error, but the SFINAE solution gives more readable code (the definition of your generic class ItemContainer contains no hint that Sort() will not generally compile). –  Walter Oct 17 '12 at 8:40
    
@Walter No, it presents, see the end of header: template<> void CSortedOrderContainer::Sort(); I don't need to specify entire template for single member specialization. –  Rost Oct 17 '12 at 9:50
    
@Walter From my point of view SFINAE is much worse readable. –  Rost Oct 17 '12 at 9:52
    
The SFINAE constructs may look cumbersome for those who don't know them, but enable_if is rather self-explanatory. Your solution, on the other hand, contains no hint (in the class definition) that member Sort() will not compile for certain template arguments of the class template. It is thus much less clear to most human readers. –  Walter Oct 17 '12 at 10:22
    
Btw, BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT is really awful, as it does not generate a nice or even useful error message. Why using such an awful macro, if the language provides a static_assert? –  Walter Oct 17 '12 at 10:25
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