Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently spent a fairly substantial amount of time tracking down a problem that turned out to be caused by compiling a library with -D_GLIBCXX_DEBUG (which tells libstdc++ to use a debug version of the standard library with extra checks) but compiling the client program without. This caused an ABI compatibility problem.

Is there some way I can automatically detect problems like this with GCC? Visual Studio provides the detect_mismatch pragma which I think would have served this purpose, but I'm unaware of any GCC equivalent. GCC does something with embedding a symbol name (e.g. GLIBCXX_3.4.9), and I can imagine schemes that would cause a linking error because of an undefined symbol if a corresponding symbol (e.g. mylib_debug_stl) were not present, but the only ways I can think of to get a use of that symbol are really hacky.

Alternatively, how do other people avoid this issue? Build the checked version of the library to a different name or something like that?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is there some way I can automatically detect problems like this with GCC?

Only the linker can detect if you link incompatible code, not the compiler.

The alternative linker, gold, can detect some problems with the --detect-odr-violations option.

Alternatively, how do other people avoid this issue? Build the checked version of the library to a different name or something like that?

I just ensure I rebuild everything when I want to use the Debug Mode, I don't think I've ever wanted to keep a library around that was built with Debug Mode. It's meant for debugging, not for normal use.

I rarely use -D_GLIBCXX_DEBUG anyway, I more often do something like:

#if 0
# include <debug/vector>
namespace my_class_stl = __gnu_debug;
#else
#include <vector>
namespace my_class_stl = std;
#endif

struct my_class
{
  typedef my_class_stl::vector<int> container;
  typedef container::iterator iterator;
  // ...
};

Then I change the preprocessor condition when I want to use a Debug Mode vector for that specific class, without affecting every container in the program. Because the change involves writing to the file (and so updating its timestamp) anything that depends on that header will get rebuilt by make, and there are two distinct types, std::vector<int> and __gnu_debug::vector<int>, which have different symbols and can't be confused by the linker.

Just defining _GLIBCXX_DEBUG doesn't cause all dependencies to be rebuilt, and silently alters the definition of std::vector globally, rather than changing specific containers to a different type with a different name, __gnu_debug::vector

share|improve this answer
    
I tried --detect-odr-violations (with Gold) and it was silent on my issue. I went back to the documentation, and from what I can tell, your suggestion to use namespace aliases is actually somewhat similar to what GNU's libstdc++ tries to do; they put the non-debug containers into std::__cxx1998, the release containers into std::__debug, and then use a namespace association ("inline namespace") to bring the appropriate one into scope in std. [continued] –  EvanED Oct 10 '12 at 22:20
    
[continued] My read of that is that it should also be avoiding linker problems... which makes me wonder if there's a "bug" in the library that's causing it to not detect it in my case. –  EvanED Oct 10 '12 at 22:22
    
let's continue this on the libstdc++ list –  Jonathan Wakely Oct 10 '12 at 23:02
    
@JonathanWakely It doesn't silently change the definition -- the mangled name changes, and you should get link errors (unresolved symbols) if you rebuild parts, but not all that requires rebuild. –  Employed Russian Oct 13 '12 at 23:27
    
@EmployedRussian, see the example I gave at gcc.gnu.org/ml/libstdc++/2012-10/msg00077.html which does get a silent change in meaning that doesn't affect any mangled symbols and doesn't cause linker errors, but causes runtime errors. –  Jonathan Wakely Oct 14 '12 at 14:13
add comment

turned out to be caused by compiling a library with -D_GLIBCXX_DEBUG (which tells libstdc++ to use a debug version of the standard library with extra checks) but compiling the client program without.

It is an explicit libsdc++ debugging mode design goal to support such configuration, and I somewhat doubt that that was the actual cause of your problem.

The problem may have disappeared after you rebuilt the library without -D_GLIBCXX_DEBUG, but that doesn't prove that the ABI incompatibility was the root cause.

share|improve this answer
    
(1) I had a program that was crashing on bad memory accesses when building when inconsistent _GLIBCXX_DEBUG settings and yet not only failed to crash but valgrinded clean when compiled with consistent settings in either direction. (2) It is an explicit goal of the libstdc++ mode to detect such errors, but as Jonathan Wakely linked above (gcc.gnu.org/ml/libstdc++/2012-10/msg00077.html), they did not achieve this goal in full. (And from my understanding will be unable to without explicit support from the GCC C++ compiler and linker.) –  EvanED Oct 20 '12 at 2:25
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.