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Basically I have a DataTable with a rows containing part numbers and a couple of columns that contain information on those parts.

In order to compare those infos with the data we have in the database, I have determined I have one of two options.

Option 1 - Loop through each row and SELECT the data

void CompareData(DataTable dt) {
    foreach (DataRow entry in dt.Rows) {
        //select that row
        DataRow dbEntry = ExecuteQuery("SELECT * FROM Parts WHERE partno='" + entry["partno"] + "'").Rows[0];
        if (dbEntry["info1"] == entry["info1"]) {
            //do something
        } else {
            //do something
        }
    }
}

Option 2 - SELECT all data at once and compare via loops

void CompareData(DataTable dt, string[] parts) {
    DataTable dbEntries = ExecuteQuery("SELECT * FROM Parts WHERE partno IN('" + String.Join(parts, "','") + "')");
    foreach (DataRow entry in dt.Rows) {
        foreach (DataRow dbEntry in dt.Rows) {
            if (dbEntry["partno"] == entry["partno"]) {
                if (dbEntry["info1"] == entry["info1"]) {
                    //do something
                } else {
                    //do something
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

They both seem pretty inefficient, so I'm not really sure what to do. Would LINQ speed this process up? I've never really used it but just browsing around it looks like something that could help.

share|improve this question
6  
The fewer database calls the better. Therefore I would vote for your option 2. – Uwe Keim Sep 27 '12 at 20:16
1  
Try both and see... – jrummell Sep 27 '12 at 20:21
1  
Try if you can eliminate the creation of the first DataTable altogether and do the whole comparison directly on your database server in pure SQL, returning only matching records. This would allow to get rid of the two nested(!) loops leaving only one single SQL query. – Uwe Keim Sep 27 '12 at 20:29
1  
As others have said, the less database calls the better. But it would be trivial to try out both and see for yourself. – jrummell Sep 27 '12 at 20:36
1  
This is interesting, @UweKeim. I am getting the DataTable dt from a user input. But if I fed that into a database table, then I could tailor the SELECT. I ultimately want to update those rows with the new data, after running some validation checks on it. – tedski Sep 27 '12 at 20:37
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Make as few DB calls as possible. You'll be more efficient 99.9% of the time. (general rule to code by)

share|improve this answer
    
Giving the honor to you :-). It's worth a comment only IMO. – Uwe Keim Sep 27 '12 at 20:20
1  
@UweKeim Ha ha. I thought about explaining the connection delays (and etc.) to be more precise, but the general rule just seems most correct. – Nick Vaccaro Sep 27 '12 at 20:21

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