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I have some documentation in code that I'd like to format nicely:

# book_id - integer
# chapter_id - integer (Optional)
# relative_url - Text: the url of the screencast file on S3, relative to the book's url
# view_count - integer

I installed Tabular.vim, which gets me this far:

# book_id      - integer
# chapter_id   - integer (Optional)
# relative_url - Text: the url of the screencast file on S3, relative to the book's url
# view_count   - integer

I'd like some automated way to generate code like this. That is, wrapped to 79 chars, indented if continuing a line from a previous comment. What I get is this:

# book_id      - integer
# chapter_id   - integer (Optional)
# relative_url - Text: the url of the screencast file on S3, relative to the
# book's url
# view_count   - integer

What I'm looking for is this:

# book_id      - integer
# chapter_id   - integer (Optional)
# relative_url - Text: the url of the screencast file on S3, relative to the
#                book's url
# view_count   - integer

Is it possible to do this with in an existing plugin or hotkey sequence? I know about gq, which will reformat text to a character width set in vim, but it won't add the indentation in things like comments.

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2 Answers 2

You can use the formatlistpat option(:set fo+=n required to work):

1. remove #

:%s/^# //

2. set flp option

:setl flp=^[^-]*-\\s

3. do formatting

gggqG

4. prepend #

:%s/^/# /

You can also use the indentexpr option:

2a. set inde option

:setl inde=15

2b. insert empty lines

:g/^/pu_

5. delete empty comments

:g/^# $/d
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That's a useful one I both didn't know and couldn't find: formatlistpat. +1 –  sehe Sep 28 '12 at 6:47
    
Hm, this doesn't seem to indent the new line(s) out to the dash. Am I missing something? –  Eric Hu Oct 2 '12 at 19:23

Perhaps the easiest way to automate arbitrary tasks like these is with the help of recordings. With a recording, you can record any commands you used the first time you fix the documentation, and then repeat them very easily.

For example, assuming that your mentioned documentation is at the beginning of the file:

First, use set textwidth=79 to let Vim know the maximum amount of characters per line. Then:

  1. Press qq to start recording
  2. Press gg to go to the beginning of the file
  3. Press gq} to reformat the documentation block.
  4. Press :Tabularize - to use your plugin
  5. Press :bnext to go to the next buffer
  6. Press q to stop the recording.

Now, if you press 1000@q the recording would be repeated for all buffers open in vim. You could also just press @q whenever you want to perform it for the current file. Take a look at :help gq and :help q for more information.

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I clarified on my question a bit. I already use macros, but I want a way to automate everything I've done into one or a few keystrokes, including the indentation out to the - character –  Eric Hu Oct 2 '12 at 19:39

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