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Let's say I have the following two class definitions (only the access specifier for bar() is different, everything else is the same):

class MyClass {
public:
    void foo();
    void bar();   // bar() is public

private:
    int member;
};

and

class MyClass {
public:
    void foo();

private:
    void bar();   // bar() is private
    int member;
};

Does a compiler consider the classes to be "different" in terms of what code the compiler produces? (Or in other words: Does the compiler treat it differently apart from access permission checking?)

This is the same question as: Can the following code cause any trouble like undefined behavior? (Provided that it is compiled in different units, with or without X being defined, and linked together afterwards.)

class MyClass {
public:
    void foo();

#ifdef X
private:
#endif
    void bar();

private:
    int member;
};

I'm interested in a compiler-independent answer as well as in a GCC-specific one (as this is my primary target compiler).

This becomes interesting if we want to "simulate" things like package private from the Java world in C++ by defining a specific macro within the "package".

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1  
Since #define private public is common "hack" to make Unit testing - then it works at least for gcc. But I guess this is UB per std C++ (however not sure - so comment - not answer ;) –  PiotrNycz Sep 27 '12 at 20:38
    
Thanks @PiotrNycz, I want to do a #define libprivate private / public depending whether or not the header is compiled from within the library. So this is the same "hack" than #define private public (but it causes much less pain :D) –  leemes Sep 27 '12 at 20:46
    
What about friend? It is not uncommon for classes within one library to be friends ;) –  PiotrNycz Sep 27 '12 at 20:51
    
@PiotrNycz This will grant FULL access to the target class, but I don't want to loose the "real" private access specifier. Just add another "library private" one like Javas "package private". However, I can imagine defining libprivate to be still private within the library when compiled in release mode while adding all library classes as friends. But when developing the library changing the friends every now and then will be a pain, also the missing "real" private. –  leemes Sep 27 '12 at 20:55
    
btw, as an aside, Access to private members. That's easy! –  Realz Slaw Sep 27 '12 at 21:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's definitely undefined behaviour to violate the one-definition rule, which requires that all definitions of the same class type be identical.

Note that the memory layout of a class is only specified within each access level, so changing access levels can very realistically lead to a different memory layout of the class.

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Good point. Can you cite a reference for the 2nd point that the "memory layout of a class is only specified within each access level"? –  Realz Slaw Sep 27 '12 at 21:22
1  
@RealzSlaw: In C++11, it's 9.2/13. –  Kerrek SB Sep 27 '12 at 21:37

It would seem that this would not be a good idea:

changing the access rights to some functions or data members, for example from private to public. With some compilers, this information may be part of the signature. If you need to make a private function protected or even public, you have to add a new function that calls the private one.

Policies/Binary Compatibility Issues With C++

However, I don't think this should result in undefined behavior, but rather should result in a link error or symbol loading error.

UPDATE:

Testing on GCC (4.6.1), changing access rights worked without a problem.

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Thank you for this helpful link and quote. I wonder which compilers those are... For GCC I successfully tested the linkage of objects with classes having different access specifiers. Now I'm just wondering which compilers I "kick out" of my compatibility list when doing things like this. Do you know more about that? –  leemes Sep 27 '12 at 20:41
1  
I tested gcc myself, and it works without a problem (gcc (GCC) 4.6.1). No, I don't know which compilers fail, but if I find anything, I'll add it. –  Realz Slaw Sep 27 '12 at 20:48
    
@leemes mearie.org/documents/mscmangle/index.en#function would seem to rule MSVC out. However, it would be best to test it and I cannot. –  Realz Slaw Sep 27 '12 at 20:55
    
Yup, you're right. Thought about throwing away MSVC support for my library though... But I see a possible solution: See the 4th comment on the question. –  leemes Sep 27 '12 at 20:59

Not a direct answer - just an idea:

With smart using of friend keywords you can achieve the same effect like with libprivate hack. You can limit access to only some of your privacy. You just need to use friend twice:

class Example {
private:
   typedef int A;
   void fooA() {}
   static void barA() {}

   typedef int B;
   void fooB() {}
   static void barB() {}
   friend class LibAccessToExample;
}; 

#ifdef libprivate
class LibAccessToExample {
private:
   typedef Example::B B;
   static void  fooB(Example& e) { e.fooB(); }
   static void  barB() { Example::barB(); }
   // and all the classes needed this access at some state
   friend class Example1;
   friend class Example2;
   friend class Example3;
   friend class Example4; 
};
#endif

With some smart usage of macros you can make this easier to code:

#define LIBCLASSES friend class Example1; friend class Example2; ...
#define FRIENDNAME(clazz) LibAccessTo##clazz
#define FWDDEF(clazz, type) typedef clazz::type type
...

#ifdef libprivate
class FRIENDNAME(Example) {
private:
   FWDDEF(Example, B);
   FWDSTATICFUNC(Example, void, fooB);
   FWDFUNC(Example, void, fooB);
   LIBCLASSES;
};
#endif
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While I like your "hack", it seems a lot more uncomfortable than the dirty hack from my question. I dislike that I need to call those "libprivate" functions via the complicated helper class as static function calls resulting in bad code style like FRIENDNAME(MyClass)::foo(instance) instead of just instance.foo(). But apart from that, I can't see why the members within the helper class are private (and that the class needs friends as a result), since the whole class only exists within the library... –  leemes Sep 27 '12 at 21:35
    
I sometimes add an answer just to have repository of ideas which come to my mind as a result of question ;) –  PiotrNycz Sep 27 '12 at 21:46
    
Please don't think that I'm not happy about your answer ;) It's nice to see other solutions. Yours is nice on a different way than mine. :) –  leemes Sep 27 '12 at 21:51

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