Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to program the coin change problem in Scala using recursion. The code that i have written is as follows.

def countChange(money: Int, coins: List[Int]): Int = {
  def ways(change: List[Int], size: Int, capacity: Int): Int = {
    if(capacity == 0) 1
    if((capacity < 0) || (size <= 0)) 0

    //println and readLine to check and control each recursive call.

    println("calling ways(",change, change.length-1, capacity,") + ways(",change,   change.length, capacity - change(change.length - 1),")")
    readLine()
    //

    ways(change, change.length-1, capacity) + ways(change, change.length, capacity - change(change.length - 1))
  }
  ways(coins, coins.length, money)
}

On running the code, it does not terminate and keeps on calling the first recursive call. Where am I going wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/q/15859432/1305344 –  Jacek Laskowski Apr 8 '13 at 7:15
    
Isn't this a violation of coursera honor code?! –  tkoomzaaskz Oct 6 at 7:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Simply stating a value does not make Scala return it; you either need an explicit return, or it has to be the last item stated. Thus:

if (capacity == 0) return 1

or

if (capacity == 0) 1
else if (...)
else { ... }
share|improve this answer
    
are you sure it works? i'm still having the same problem as stated earlier –  Muavia Sep 27 '12 at 21:22
2  
@user1050258 - Well, that wasn't the only problem--you also use change.length-1 instead of size-1 in various places. You don't update change itself in your solution! (Hint: if you did update change, then you would have avoided this bug and wouldn't need the size argument....) –  Rex Kerr Sep 27 '12 at 21:37

Here is my implementation: I have tested it and it works fine

def countChange(money: Int, coins: List[Int]): Int = {

    def count(capacity: Int, changes: List[Int]): Int = {
                if(capacity == 0) 
                  1
                else if(capacity < 0) 
                  0
                else if(changes.isEmpty && capacity>=1 )
                  0
                else
                        count(capacity, changes.tail) + count(capacity - changes.head, changes)
    }

    count(money, coins.sortWith(_.compareTo(_) < 0))
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice! Although, I think changing names (money -> capacity, coins -> changes) makes it harder to understand. –  Filip Spiridonov Nov 8 '13 at 12:29
3  
is the sorting really needed? –  Verneri Åberg Mar 10 at 21:53
    
I have a question am new to scala : how does the compiler reads this line : count(capacity, changes.tail) + count(capacity - changes.head, changes) ? I know how the recursion works but am having problem understanding how the compiler executes the last line –  moe May 13 at 10:01
1  
@moe you may choose to watch week 1 lecture of this course by Martin Odersky class.coursera.org/progfun-004/lecture/4 –  Sutikshan Dubey Jun 30 at 12:48

Hey I just thought it would be better to see not only the amount but also the list of them, so put on top of the above example like :

  def moneyChanges(money: Int, coins: List[Int]) : Option[List[Seq[Int]]]= {
var listOfChange=List[Seq[Int]]()
def changeMoney(capacity: Int, changes: List[Int], listOfCoins: Option[Seq[Int]]): Int = {
  if (capacity == 0) {
    listOfChange = listOfCoins.get :: listOfChange
    1
  } else if (capacity < 0)
    0
  else if (changes.isEmpty && capacity >= 1)
    0
  else {
    changeMoney(capacity, changes.tail, listOfCoins) +
    changeMoney(capacity - changes.head, changes, 
      Some(changes.head +: listOfCoins.getOrElse(Seq())))
  }
}

changeMoney(money, coins.sortWith(_.compareTo(_) < 0), None)
Some(listOfChange)

}

share|improve this answer

Nice and simple

def countChange(money: Int, coins: List[Int]): Int = {
    if(money == 0)
         1
    else if(money > 0 && !coins.isEmpty) countChange(money - coins.head, coins) + countChange(money, coins.tail)
    else
         0
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.