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I am really amazed by the functionality of GREP in shell, earlier I used to use substring method in java but now I use GREP for it and it executes in a matter of seconds, it is blazingly faster than java code that I used to write.(according to my experience I might be wrong though)

That being said I have not been able to figure out how it is happening? there is also not much available on the web.

Can anyone help me with this?

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It is open source so you can have a look for yourself. gnu.org/software/grep/devel.html –  driis Sep 27 '12 at 20:47
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Ridiculous Fish has a great writeup answering exactly your question: ridiculousfish.com/blog/posts/old-age-and-treachery.html –  David Wolever Sep 27 '12 at 20:48
    
@WilliamPursell When the execution time goes in the seconds, the JIT has probably warmed up and the mind-numbing difference is due to (1) grep being incredibly smart about what it does and (2) the Java code making a pretty bad algorithm choice for the specific problem grep focuses on. –  delnan Sep 27 '12 at 20:51
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How much time does your Java implementation spend starting up the JVM, and how much time does it spend actually executing your code? Or it might be a matter of the algorithm you used in your Java code; an O(N^2) algorithm is likely to be slow in any language. –  Keith Thompson Sep 27 '12 at 20:51
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1 Answer

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Assuming your question regards GNU grep specifically. Here's a note from the author, Mike Haertel:

GNU grep is fast because it AVOIDS LOOKING AT EVERY INPUT BYTE.

GNU grep is fast because it EXECUTES VERY FEW INSTRUCTIONS FOR EACH BYTE that it does look at.

GNU grep uses the well-known Boyer-Moore algorithm, which looks first for the final letter of the target string, and uses a lookup table to tell it how far ahead it can skip in the input whenever it finds a non-matching character.

GNU grep also unrolls the inner loop of Boyer-Moore, and sets up the Boyer-Moore delta table entries in such a way that it doesn't need to do the loop exit test at every unrolled step. The result of this is that, in the limit, GNU grep averages fewer than 3 x86 instructions executed for each input byte it actually looks at (and it skips many bytes entirely).

GNU grep uses raw Unix input system calls and avoids copying data after reading it. Moreover, GNU grep AVOIDS BREAKING THE INPUT INTO LINES. Looking for newlines would slow grep down by a factor of several times, because to find the newlines it would have to look at every byte!

So instead of using line-oriented input, GNU grep reads raw data into a large buffer, searches the buffer using Boyer-Moore, and only when it finds a match does it go and look for the bounding newlines (Certain command line options like -n disable this optimization.)

This answer is a subset of the information taken from here.

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