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We are writing tests for a program. We want to write a functionnal test that verifies that the output of the program matches some expectation. The object returned is a complex JS object (with nested objects, many properties... etc).

We want to test that this obviously matches what we need. Up until now, we were "browsing" the object and the expected outcome, checking for each property, and each nested object. That is very cumbersome and we were wondering if there was any library that would 'build' all the tests, based just on the object. Something like this for example.

var res = {
  a: {
    alpha: [1,2,3],
    beta: "Hello",
    gamma: "World"
    },
    },
    b: 123,
    c: "It depends"
  }
};
var expectation = {
  a: {
    alpha: [1,2,4],
    beta: "Hello",
    gamma: "World"
    },
    },
    b: 123,
    c: "It depends"
  }
};

assert(res, expectation) // -> Raises an error because res[a][b][2] is different from expectation[a][b][2].

[In the example, I have simplified the complexity of our object...]

I should insist on the fact that we need a piece of code that is smart enough to tell us what is different, rather than just tell us that the 2 objects are different. We now about deep equality, but we haven't found anything that actually tells us the differences.

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4 Answers 4

Node has the built in assert module meant for testing. This has a method called deepEqual for deep equality checking.

Function signature is:

assert.deepEqual(actual, expected, [message])

Quickly written function for testing deepEquality and returning diff:

// Will test own properties only
function deepEqualWithDiff(a, e, names){
  var dif = {};
  var aKeys = Object.keys(a);
  var eKeys = Object.keys(e);

  var cKeys = aKeys;
  var dKeys = eKeys;
  var c = a;
  var d = e;
  var names = {
    c: names ? names['a'] : 'Actual',
    d: names ? names['e'] : 'Expected'
  }

  if(eKeys.length > aKeys.length){
    cKeys = eKeys;
    dKeys = aKeys;
    c = e;
    d = a;
    names = {
      d: names ? names['a'] : 'Actual',
      c: names ? names['e'] : 'Expected'
    }
  }


  for(var i = 0, co = cKeys.length; i < co; i++){
    var key = cKeys[i];
    if(typeof c[key] !== typeof d[key]){
      dif[key] = 'Type mismatch ' + names['c'] + ':' + typeof c[key] + '!==' + names['d'] + typeof d[key];
      continue;
    }
    if(typeof c[key] === 'function'){
      if(c[key].toString() !== d[key].toString()){
        dif[key] = 'Differing functions';
      }
      continue;
    }
    if(typeof c[key] === 'object'){
      if(c[key].length !== undefined){ // array
        var temp = c[key].slice(0);
        temp = temp.filter(function(el){
          return (d[key].indexOf(el) === -1);
        });
        var message = '';
        if(temp.length > 0){
          message += names['c'] + ' excess ' + JSON.stringify(temp);
        }

        temp = d[key].slice(0);
        temp = temp.filter(function(el){
          return (c[key].indexOf(el) === -1);
        });
        if(temp.length > 0){
          message += ' and ' + names['d'] + ' excess ' + JSON.stringify(temp);
        }
        if(message !== ''){
          dif[key] = message;
        }
        continue;
      }
      var diff = deepEqualWithDiff(c[key], d[key], {a:names['c'],e:names['d']});
      if(diff !== true && Object.keys(diff).length > 0){
        dif[key] = diff;
      }
      continue;
    }
    // Simple types left so
    if(c[key] !== d[key]){
      dif[key] = names['c'] + ':' + c[key] + ' !== ' + names['d'] + ':' + d[key]; 
    }
  }
  return Object.keys(dif).length > 0 ? dif : true;
}
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That's really not we're looking for, because it just indicates that the 2 objects are not equal... but fails to tell us what's different! –  Julien Genestoux Sep 27 '12 at 21:29
    
This is sort of unfortunate in that assert's deepequal can't be used in a regular isdeepequal sense (not without an exception it seems) –  Steven Lu Jan 31 at 9:12

JavaScript doesn't support object deep equality out of the box and I am not aware of anything built into the NodeJS API either.

My bet would probably be Underscore and the isEqual function.

npm install underscore

var _ = require('underscore');
var moe   = {name : 'moe', luckyNumbers : [13, 27, 34]};
var clone = {name : 'moe', luckyNumbers : [13, 27, 34]};
moe == clone;
=> false
_.isEqual(moe, clone);
=> true

Although most Node testing frameworks should also contain an object deep equality assertion but you didn't mention which one you are using.

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That's really not we're looking for, because it just indicates that the 2 objects are not equal... but fails to tell us what's different! –  Julien Genestoux Sep 27 '12 at 21:31
    
Good point, sorry I missed that. Here is a difference algorithm that is using underscore: blog.vjeux.com/2011/javascript/object-difference.html –  Daff Sep 27 '12 at 22:56

While I think the basics of object comparison have already been covered (see here and others), if you're looking for a quick and dirty way to execute these tests and see the diff between two non-equal objects, you can just run your tests using nodeunit within the Webstorm IDE (here)

Webstorm integrates particularly well with nodeunit, and for any test.equals() or test.deepEquals() assertions it provides a viewable diff with highlighting to show your descrepencies. I highly recommend the IDE for how well it integrates testing into my js development cycle.

Now, if you need the results of that test/diff to be accessible within your code, this obviously isn't enough for you and I'd recommend copying a couple of the deepEquals comparators from the first link I listed.

Good luck,

Brian

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deep-diff does what OP is asking for. It can compare two javascript objects / JSON objects and list the differences in a way that your code can access.

This is an old question so this library probably didn't exist at the time the question was asked.

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