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Say I have something like the following to trap the click even of a button:

$("#button_id").click(function() {
  //disable click event
  //do something
  //re-enable click event
}

How do I temporarily disable the click event of the button until the end of the processing of the original click occurs? I basically have the div disappear after the button is clicked, but if the user clicks on the button fast several times, it processes all those clicks before the div gets a chance to disappear. I want to "debounce" the button so that only the first click gets registered before the div disappears.

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Can you disable the button upon clicking first and check if it is disabled before you run the rest of your code? You can enable when the function returns. –  johnny Aug 11 '09 at 21:43
    
similar: stackoverflow.com/questions/4674991/… –  Cawas Mar 5 '11 at 3:04
    
3 good ways to do it stackoverflow.com/a/1922012/781695 –  buffer Mar 23 '14 at 7:24

11 Answers 11

This is a more idiomatic alternative to the artificial state variable solutions:

$("#button_id").one('click', DoSomething);

function DoSomething() {
  // do something.

  $("#button_id").one('click', DoSomething);
}

One will only execute once (until attached again). More info here: http://docs.jquery.com/Events/one

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-1; this doesn't work. For example, try rapidly clicking the button many times in this fiddle: jsfiddle.net/at75H/1 –  Mark Amery Mar 22 '14 at 17:23
    
@MarkAmery: Isn't that because you're reattaching the handler inside the callback? If you don't do that, it works as expected: jsfiddle.net/at75H/2 –  Dave Ward Mar 22 '14 at 21:06
    
You reattach the handler inside the callback in your answer, which I based my fiddle upon. You need to reattach it at some point, or else you're permanently disabling the handler instead of temporarily doing so. I think the clean solution here is to defer the reattaching of the handler using a 0ms setTimeout call - I'll write an answer about this when I have the chance. –  Mark Amery Mar 23 '14 at 0:14
    
@MarkAmery You've pointed flaws in all the answers here. Genuine question - do you have something that worked well for you. I found better answers here : stackoverflow.com/a/1922012/781695 –  buffer Mar 23 '14 at 7:26

I noticed this post was old but it appears top on google and this kind of solution was never offered so I decided to post it anyway.

You can just disable cursor-events and enable them again later via css. It is supported on all major browsers and may prove useful in some situations.

$("#button_id").click(function() {

   $("#button_id").css("pointer-events", "none");
   //do something
   $("#button_id").css("pointer-events", "auto");
}
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This is a good solution in theory but it is not that universally supported: IE support started from version 11 only. This means that there currently remain many browsers for which you have to find another solution. –  C.Champagne Dec 18 '14 at 13:07
    
There are easy ways to fix that for older IE versions if you still need to have support for them (you can use the code above in wp8 HTML5 mobile applications but not in 7). In older versions I would recommend using this method to fix it vinylfox.com/forwarding-mouse-events-through-layers –  Defain Dec 19 '14 at 6:46

using jQuery 1.7.1 or latest you can just do

clickMe = function(){ 
   $("#button_id").click(function() {
        $(this).off('click');
        //do something
        $(this).on("click", clickMe);
   });
};
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1  
Sorry, but this just doesn't work. It triggers the event every other time. When you call the function it adds the click event, so you have to click again to get it to do something. jsfiddle.net/fjNJE –  Juhana May 31 '13 at 4:59
2  
@Juhana Quite right - I find it bizarre that stuff like this gets upvoted uncritically. –  Mark Amery Mar 21 '14 at 16:30
    
Hey, we just found a solution for doubleclick! lol, but yes, you guys are right,although this is right on the paper but this will trigger the event every other time in reality! –  Parham Apr 3 '14 at 17:57
$("#button_id").click(function() {
  if($(this).data('dont')==1) return;
  $(this).data('dont',1);
  //do something
  $(this).data('dont',0);
}

Remeber that $.data() would work only for items with ID.

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I like this solution better than the .one option. I've been working with elements that may be observing than one event. By using .one, or by calling .off and .on again, I would change the order of the callbacks. By adding a data attribute that is observed by the callback functions, you're able to keep the callback order intact –  mikeweber Apr 17 '12 at 15:59
    
Your early return here will absolutely never take effect. JavaScript is single threaded, so if there are several calls to this function queued, you can be guaranteed that by the time the second one starts, the first will have finished and set your dont attribute back to 0. –  Mark Amery Mar 22 '14 at 17:36

If #button_id implies a standard HTML button (like a submit button) you can use the 'disabled' attribute to make the button inactive to the browser.

$("#button_id").click(function() {
    $('#button_id').attr('disabled', 'true');

    //do something

     $('#button_id').removeAttr('disabled');
});

What you may need to be careful with, however, is the order in which these things may happen. If you are using the jquery hide command, you may want to include the "$('#button_id').removeAttr('disabled');" as part of a call back, so that it does not happen until the hide is complete.

[edit] example of function using a callback:

$("#button_id").click(function() {
    $('#button_id').attr('disabled', 'true');
    $('#myDiv').hide(function() { $('#button_id').removeAttr('disabled'); });
});
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I was looking for a way to temporarily disable click events on elements while performing ajax requests with jQuery, but couldn't find a good solution so I made my own plugin to handle this case in elegant way. The code looks like this:

$('#mybutton').on('click', function() {
    var me = $(this);
    me.offtmp('click'); //disable the click event temporaraly while performing ajax request
    $.post(...).always(function() {
        me.ontmp('click'); //the ajax request is ready, now we can enable clicks again
    });
});

You can find the plugin with demo and docs here

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This example work.


HTML code:

  <div class="wrapper">
     <div class="mask">Something</div> 
  </div>

jQuery:

    var fade = function(){
        $(".mask").fadeToggle(500,function(){
            $(this).parent().on("click",function(){
                $(this).off("click");
                fade();
            });
        });
    };

    $(".wrapper").on("click",function(){
        $(this).off("click");
        fade();     
    });
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You can do it like the other people before me told you using a look:

A.) Use .data of the button element to share a look variable (or a just global variable)

if ($('#buttonId').data('locked') == 1)
    return
$('#buttonId').data('locked') = 1;
// Do your thing
$('#buttonId').data('locked') = 0;

B.) Disable mouse signals

$("#buttonId").css("pointer-events", "none");
// Do your thing
$("#buttonId").css("pointer-events", "auto");

C.) If it is a HTML button you can disable it (input [type=submit] or button)

$("#buttonId").attr("disabled", "true");
// Do your thing
$("#buttonId").attr("disabled", "false");

But watch out for other threads! I failed many times because my animation (fading in or out) took one second. E.g. fadeIn/fadeOut supports a callback function as second parameter. If there is no other way just do it using setTimeout(callback, delay).

Greets, Thomas

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This code will display loading on the button label, and set button to disable state, then after processing, re-enable and return back the original button text:

$(function () {

        $(".btn-Loading").each(function (idx, elm) {
            $(elm).click(function () {
                //do processing
                if ($(".input-validation-error").length > 0)
                    return;
                $(this).attr("label", $(this).text()).text("loading ....");
                $(this).delay(1000).animate({ disabled: true }, 1000, function () {
                    //original event call
                    $.when($(elm).delay(1000).one("click")).done(function () {
                        $(this).animate({ disabled: false }, 1000, function () {
                            $(this).text($(this).attr("label"));
                        })
                    });
                    //processing finalized
                });
            });
        });
        // and fire it after definition
    }
   );
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$("#button_id").click(function() {
    $('#button_id').attr('disabled', 'true');
    $('#myDiv').hide(function() { $('#button_id').removeAttr('disabled'); });
}); 

Don't use .attr() to do the disabled, use .prop(), it's better.

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Why is it better? –  reformed Mar 1 at 1:09

A simple solution would be to comment the code inside the onclick attribute:

To disable the onClick:

var code = $('#mybutton').attr("onclick");  
btn.attr("onclick", '/*' + code + '*/');

To enable the onClick:

var code = $('#mybutton').attr("onclick");
code = code.replace(/\*\//gi, " ");
code = code.replace(/\/\*/gi, " ");
$('#mybutton').attr("onclick", code);
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it doesn't work –  Nir O. Apr 30 '12 at 15:31
    
a bad approach. and neither work. –  Sudhanshu Yadav Jan 20 '13 at 16:31

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