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I am attempting to allocate some dynamic memory for a custom stack in my c program. However, I receive the error 0xC0000005: Access violation writing location 0x00000014 during the malloc call.

Here is my struct definition and my function calling malloc:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define EMPTY -1;

typedef enum boolean_tag { TRUE, FALSE } Boolean;
typedef enum direction_tag { ACROSS, DOWN } AnswerDirection;    /*The direction of an answer in the crossword*/

typedef struct answer_tag {
    /*A single 'Answer' is a single node making up a linked list*/
    int answerNumber;
    AnswerDirection direction;
    char *answerString;         /*The answer's value in chars*/
    struct answer_tag *nextAnswer;      /*Points to the next answer in the linked list*/
} Answer;

typedef struct space_tag {
    /*A single space inside of a board*/
    int numberOfCurrentAnswers; /*How many Answers currently cross through the space*/
    char value;
    int x;
    int y;
    struct space_tag *behindSpace;
    struct space_tag *nextSpace;
} Space;

    void InitAnswers(Answer *);
    Space *InitCrossword();
    Space *InitSpace();
    void ProgramClosingCleaning(Space *);

main(){
Space *board;
board = InitCrossword();
ProgramClosingCleaning(board);
}

void InitAnswers(Answer *answerKey){

}

Space *InitCrossword(){
int xLimit, yLimit;         /*Limits set*/
int xTraverse, yTraverse;   /*Coordinate variables to use in traversing*/
Space *currentSpace = NULL;
Space *nextSpace;           
printf("Please enter the size of the board: x y\n");
scanf("%d %d", &xLimit, &yLimit);
for (xTraverse = 0; xTraverse < xLimit; xTraverse++){
    for (yTraverse = 0; yTraverse < yLimit; yTraverse++){
        nextSpace = InitSpace();
        nextSpace->x = xTraverse;
        nextSpace->y = yTraverse;
        nextSpace->numberOfCurrentAnswers = 0;
        nextSpace->value = EMPTY;
        nextSpace->behindSpace = currentSpace;
        currentSpace->nextSpace = nextSpace;
        currentSpace = nextSpace;
    }
}
while (currentSpace->behindSpace != NULL)
    currentSpace = currentSpace->behindSpace;
return currentSpace;
}

Space *InitSpace(){
return (Space *) malloc(sizeof(Space));
}

void ProgramClosingCleaning(Space *currentSpace){
Space *nextSpace;
while (currentSpace != NULL){
    nextSpace = currentSpace->nextSpace;
    free(currentSpace);
    }
}

Thanks for any help!

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Can you post a small program that reproduces this? –  hmjd Sep 27 '12 at 21:55
    
It appears that your heap has been corrupted by something earlier. Also, it seems that you're running on Windows (by the error code); I;m not exactly sure, but I think that Windows may have some particular requirements/expectations on the stack being used by a thread. I'm not sure whether or not you can just set the stack for a thread to some arbitrary block of memory. –  Michael Burr Sep 27 '12 at 21:57
    
I posted a sample program. Yes, I am running windows. –  atob Sep 27 '12 at 21:59
    
@atob I think you're trying to write something to the lastSpace before assigning valid memory to it. lastSpace is at an offset of 20 (or 0x00000014) from the beginning of the struct. Also, posting code that doesn't even compile is not of any help. –  Praetorian Sep 27 '12 at 22:00
1  
Hi atob, welcome to Stack Overflow. By the way, you would have found your bug right away using the clang static analyzer. (It actually finds three bugs in your code, only one of which is the answer given by hmjd.) Check it out yourself to find the other two. –  Douglas B. Staple Sep 28 '12 at 2:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I see two problems with the posted code (which the compiler should have emitted warnings for):

  • Implicit declaration of Init() and InitSpace() which means they will have a return type of int
  • Init() does not return a value.

The problem is this line in InitCrossword() function:

currentSpace->nextSpace = nextSpace;

on first iteration of the for loop currentSpace is NULL.

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I just posted stub code. I have the rest of the information in my actual program. –  atob Sep 27 '12 at 22:03
    
@atob, can you post actual code? The devil is in the detail. –  hmjd Sep 27 '12 at 22:06
    
Ok, I added the code. –  atob Sep 27 '12 at 22:10
    
You solved it, thanks a lot. I've been working on this for a long time! –  atob Sep 27 '12 at 22:15

I'm pretty sure the syntax you're using creates your struct with type space_tag and Space is actually a variable (see http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/structures/).

Try this code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct Space {
    int numberOfCurrentAnswers;
    char value;
    int x;
    int y;
    struct Space *lastSpace;
    struct Space *nextSpace;
};

main(){
    struct Space *space;
    space = Init();
}

Space *Init(){
    struct Space *nextSpace;
    nextSpace = InitSpace();
}

Space *InitSpace(){
    return (Space *) malloc(sizeof(Space));
}

Edited based on example code posted

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You code generated an error, so I added struct in front of space_tag: return (struct space_tag *) malloc(sizeof(struct space_tag)); It still generated the same error –  atob Sep 27 '12 at 22:01

You are missing the return function in Init();

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