Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

To Set up the scenario, Lets say I have 100000 rows in the table and it grows more and more each day. This queue currently takes over 2 seconds to retrieve only about 40 or 50 rows from the table.

The data in this table are grouped by DateTime references so I start off grouping all the data by DateTime because this is the only equal value to other rows in the table. Each group of rows could be anywhere from 1 row to 5 rows MAX. I then select the grouped rows, pick apart the data and display it out to the user. The problem I can see is that I cause an EXIST and a Group by in the SQL. I must select all 40 rows at once to make the queue faster, but I pick each group out in a FOR loop. So how if any way can I make this queue faster? Its the Laggiest of them all and my users are complaining about the 2 second wait time. Please help.

(from yy in Data_Captured_Type_Militaries
	where yy.DateTime_Added >= DateTime.UtcNow.AddHours(-72)
	(from xx in Data_Captured_Type_Militaries
	where xx.DateTime_Added >= DateTime.UtcNow.AddHours(-72)
	group xx by xx.DateTime_Added into gg
	select gg.Key).Contains(yy.DateTime_Added)
	select new
	{
		yy.Elites,
		yy.DateTime_Added,
		yy.Uid,
		yy.Military_Location,
		yy.Province_ID,
		yy.Time_To_Return
	}).ToList()

What it translates to:

SELECT [t0].[Elites], [t0].[DateTime_Added], [t0].[uid] AS [Uid],[t0].[Military_Location], [t0].[Province_ID], [t0].[Time_To_Return]
FROM [Data_Captured_Type_Military] AS [t0]
WHERE (EXISTS (
    SELECT NULL AS [EMPTY]
    FROM (
        SELECT [t1].[DateTime_Added]
        FROM [Data_Captured_Type_Military] AS [t1]
        WHERE [t1].[DateTime_Added] >= @p0
        GROUP BY [t1].[DateTime_Added]
        ) AS [t2]
    WHERE [t2].[DateTime_Added] = [t0].[DateTime_Added]
    )) AND ([t0].[DateTime_Added] >= @p1)
share|improve this question
1  
I remember playing this game many a year ago.... :) –  Jimmy Aug 11 '09 at 21:39
    
Thanks Jimmy, but that sure doesn't help. lol –  SpoiledTechie.com Aug 11 '09 at 21:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You sort of explain this, but I still don't understand what this portion of the query does for you:

where (from xx in Data_Captured_Type_Militaries
       where xx.DateTime_Added >= DateTime.UtcNow.AddHours(-72)
       group xx by xx.DateTime_Added into gg
       select gg.Key).Contains(yy.DateTime_Added)

This nested query grabs each unique DateTime_Added within the last three days. You then use this to narrow down your outer query by making sure each of those DateTime_Addeds exist in the inner query.

The outer query is already narrowed down to the most recent three days of DateTime_Addeds, so it looks like the inner query won't actually do anything to it. I could be wrong, but is the inner query even needed at all?

If it is, please expand or let me know what I'm not understanding.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree with this -- there always exists an xx which is the same record as yy, so the Contains is always true. –  Jimmy Aug 11 '09 at 22:04
    
Good point Ryan... Thanks for the great Eye! I took out that center part and it works the same exact way... Thanks for the good eye! –  SpoiledTechie.com Aug 12 '09 at 0:09

The query looks pretty simple. I'd start by looking at your table indexes in SQL Server. Are you indexing DateTime_Added?

If you don't currently have an index on that column, try this (in SQL Server Management Studio):

CREATE INDEX IX_Data_Captured_Type_Military_DateTime_Added 
ON Data_Captured_Type_Military (DateTime_Added)
GO
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.