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The private modifier specifies that the member can only be accessed in its own class. But am I able to access it using a public method that get inherited from base class. Can someone explain me why? Does this mean object of Child class contain a member called b?

Here's the code:

package a;

public class Base {
    private int b;

    public int getB() {
        return b;
    }

    public void exposeB() {
        System.out.println(getB());
    }

    public Base(int b) {
        this.b = b;

    }
}

package b;

public class Child extends Base {

    Child(int b) {
        super(b);
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Child b = new Child(2);
        // Prints  2
        System.out.println("Accessing private base variable" + b.getB());
    }
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you are not accessing the private variable in your super class directly. you are implementing the concept of Encapsulation. you are using the public getter method(in this case getB()) to make your private data accesed by other classes. thus, you can access private variable b through public getter but you never cant access b directly on its instace from another/subclass

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+1 for "directly" and "encapsulation" –  Brian Sep 27 '12 at 22:41
    
@Brian thanks:). i remember this was oneof the questions in my job interview like an year ago ... :) –  PermGenError Sep 27 '12 at 22:42
    
@chaitanya10 thanks for your nice explanation –  questborn Sep 27 '12 at 22:45
    
@questborn you are welcome :)dont forget to accept the best answer as there are many here. :) –  PermGenError Sep 27 '12 at 22:47

In class Base, the field b is private but getB() is public so anybody can call that method.

What you can expect to fail compilation is something like:

System.out.println( "Accessing private base variable" + b.b );

(unless that line is called from within a method of Base itself).

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You will not be able to access b directly in Child because it is private. You can, however, use the base-class's getB method which is public (and hence can be called anywhere).

To allow only extending classes and other classes in your package to access the field, you can declare it as protected.


class A {
    private int n;
    public A(int n) { this.n = n; }
    public int n() { return n; }
}

class B extends A {
    public B(int n) { super(n); }
    public void print() { System.out.println(n); }  // oops! n is private
}

class A {
    protected int n;
    public A(int n) { this.n = n; }
    public int n() { return n; }
}

class B extends A {
    public B(int n) { super(n); }
    public void print() { System.out.println(n); }  // ok
}
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+1 for the word "directly", this should be more emphasized, maybe with an example of how direct access can allow manipulation. –  Brian Sep 27 '12 at 22:40

The private modifier means that you can't reference that field outside the class. Because getB() is public, however, you can reference that method. The getB() method can reference the private b field, because it's inside the class, and therefore can access it.

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Private variable means that you can't access directly the variable from its class.... Declaring that variable private means that you can't do this

Myclass.myprivatevariable = 3

This will throw a compile error complaining that myprivatevariable is not visible fro the outside

But, as you did.... Declaring an internal method as getter or setter, public, you are allowing the user, only just through that method, to access indirectly that variable... That is always the preferred way to do.

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This means private variable in parent class got inherited into child class since am able to manipulate it using child object? –  questborn Sep 27 '12 at 22:28
    
No, non not exactly.... The child class in this case, the inherits the public method **getB() ** from the parent class that can modify the parent class private variable.. Check this doc from.. Oracle <docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/…; –  Guglielmo Moretti Sep 28 '12 at 5:45

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