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Given an URL such as this one,

http://www.example.com/some directory/some file

how do you encode this URL? Browsers automatically encode it. In Java I couldn't find a ready made function. I suspect there should be such a function because this is generally needed.

When I try to use the URI class using the constructor with single String, and parse components of the URL, such as authority, path, etc, it gives error because it expects an encoded URL.

Do you know a ready made function that will produce, for example in this case:

http://www.example.com/some%20directory/some%20file

share|improve this question
    
URLEncoder conforms to the HTML 4.01 spec. – Beau Grantham Sep 27 '12 at 22:23
    
related to stackoverflow.com/questions/26254051/… – Paul Verest Oct 8 '14 at 11:17
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

final URL url = new URL("http://www.example.com/some directory/some file");
final URI uri = new URI(url.getProtocol(), url.getHost(), url.getPath(), null);

System.out.println(uri.toASCIIString());
share|improve this answer
    
That is not for a single URL. I am looking for a generic function. Otherwise I can do it manually, right? As I explained in the question, the URI class does not accept a URL that is not already encoded. So I cannot separate it into components in the first place. – memento Sep 27 '12 at 23:20
    
Ah ok, I edit this post and add URL. Then you don't have to do it manually... – Walery Strauch Sep 28 '12 at 0:02
    
Wonderful. I guess this is the cleanest way. I was trying to give the URL string to the URI class, instead of the URL class. Thanks! – memento Sep 28 '12 at 3:35

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