Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm running a clustered instance of Quartz in the context of a Java EE application. One of the nodes (selected randomly) in the Java EE application will fire a series of Quartz jobs to be executed immediately (as explained in this post); right before triggering each job, a JobListener associated to that job is added to the scheduler's ListenerManager.

If I understand Quartz's inner working correctly, the node that actually executes each job will be selected at random from the available nodes. If that's the case, how can the listener's methods be called if the listener was created in a node different from the one that executed the job? Can I assume that the list of listeners in ListenerManager is global and the same for all the nodes in the cluster? Or each node has its own ListManager with its own listeners?

share|improve this question
    
Did you ever get an answer to this question? –  ccleve Nov 1 '13 at 16:19
    
@ccleve no, and in the end we didn't use Quartz in cluster –  Óscar López Nov 1 '13 at 16:21
    
Did you implement a clustered solution using something other than Quartz? –  ccleve Nov 1 '13 at 16:23
    
@ccleve no, we simply didn't use a cluster. Our experiments showed that the listeners in Quartz are not cluster-aware –  Óscar López Nov 1 '13 at 16:26
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As per Quartz documentation:

Listeners are registered with the scheduler during run time, and are NOT stored in the JobStore along with the jobs and triggers. This is because listeners are typically an integration point with your application. Hence, each time your application runs, the listeners need to be re-registered with the scheduler.

Refer to http://quartz-scheduler.org/files/documentation/Quartz-2.1.x-Documentation.pdf

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.