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I'm making a few test cases and noticed I needed to check to see if MyObject was Equal to another MyObject.

I created my Equals methods like so:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) return false;
    if (ReferenceEquals(this, obj)) return true;
    return obj.GetType() == typeof(MyObject) && Equals((MyObject) obj);
}

public bool Equals(MyObject other)
{
    if (ReferenceEquals(null, other)) return false;
    if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;
    return Equals(other.listItems, listItems);
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return (TimeBlocks != null ? TimeBlocks.GetHashCode() : 0);
}

There's a List called listItems that is not evaluating to true. The listItem is of another object type that does have an override on the Equals method.

How does the List decide if one list is equal to another?

Should I be checking each item against the other instead?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, first off, the overload for Equals that takes a MyObject is treating listItems as static. If that's the case so be it, but my guess is that was a typo and that MyObject.listItems should be other.listItems instead.

Anyway. If listItems is a List<OtherObject>, the List class itself doesn't override Equals, so it only uses the Object overload which compares hash codes, and for Object those hash codes are based on the object reference. So, two List variables will only be equal if they reference the same List.

To make it work the way you want, you'll need to loop through the list and compare items. Exactly how you do that depends on whether order matters:

//order-specific equality; true only if equal items are in the same order
public bool Equals(MyObject other)
{
    if (ReferenceEquals(null, other)) return false;
    if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;
    return other.listItems.Count == listItems.Count 
       && listItems.Select((l,i)=>other.listItems[i] == l).All(b=>b);
}

//order-independent equality; true if all items in one are in the other in any order
public bool Equals(MyObject other)
{
    if (ReferenceEquals(null, other)) return false;
    if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;
    return other.listItems.Count == listItems.Count 
       && listItems.Select((l,i)=>other.listItems.Contains(l)).All(b=>b);
}

The first method, given two equal lists, will be linear; the second will be N^2 complexity and while you could probably improve on that it would be complicated.

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You caught a pretty bad typo, thanks. Why wouldn't you use Enumerable.SequenceEqual()? –  Nate-Wilkins Sep 27 '12 at 23:13
    
No reason; it's pretty much the same as the order-dependent version from my answer and you should see minimal if any performance difference. However, it will be order-dependent; if a list with values ABCDE and a list with ACDBE are supposed to be equal you can't use SequenceEquals. –  KeithS Sep 27 '12 at 23:34
1  
I do kind of like seeing as much of my implementation as possible. Rule number 2 of performance optimization is "just because you can't see the implementation doesn't mean it isn't costing you". Select and All are both very simple; I know exactly what's going on behind the scenes. Not quite so much with SequenceEquals. –  KeithS Sep 27 '12 at 23:37
    
Thanks for the clarifications, I don't necessarily need it for this example but definitely a more volatile option. Probably will end up using this thanks! –  Nate-Wilkins Sep 27 '12 at 23:41

Have you tried the Enumerable.SequenceEqual() method?

This will iterate over each item in the both of the List's and check if each element is equal. It will use your objects' overridden Equals() method.

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Perfect. Thanks for the response! –  Nate-Wilkins Sep 27 '12 at 22:48

Is this what you are looking for: Enumerable.SequenceEqual

return other.listItems.SequenceEqual(listItems);

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+1 Ok I believe that you did have the right answer initially, even though I didn't understand it at the time. –  Nate-Wilkins Sep 27 '12 at 22:50
    
I actually implemented exactly Enumerable.SequenceEqual as an extension method and then found that .net had it. I think I have had some issue with SequenceEqual at one time but I don't remember what it was. –  Johan Larsson Sep 27 '12 at 22:54

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