Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
JavaScript variables declare outside or inside loop?

So..I've seen many articles saying that we should use the following style.

var i;
for(i=0;i <= 10; i++) {
  // do something here
}

I've been using the above style for while, but I just wonder if it really helps except the readability.

Isn't it same as the following?

for(var i=0; i<=10; i++) {

}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Jon, Bergi, Ken White, WATTO Studios, Jason Sturges Sep 28 '12 at 3:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
    
Na, it's just personal style. Some prefer to make the variable hoisting explicit by declaring everything at the beginning at the code. –  Bergi Sep 27 '12 at 23:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It makes a difference if for some reason (should never be the case) you've declared a global variable by the same name outside the context of the function.

http://jsfiddle.net/bFRKU/

var i = 'global'; 

function test(){
    alert(i);   
    for(var i = 0; i < 10; i++){
     //do something   
    }
}
test(); 

In the above example, you'll notice that the alert returns "undefined." This is because variable definitions are hoisted to the top of the function (no matter where they are declared within the function). So in reality, the above is interpreted as:

http://jsfiddle.net/bFRKU/1/

var i = 'global'; 

function test(){
    var i; 
    alert(i);   
    for(i = 0; i < 10; i++){
     //do something   
    }
}
test(); 

Thus the alert "undefined." Ultimately, the only reason to place your variable declarations at the top of your functions is to reduce this potential confusion. ​

share|improve this answer
1  
Good to see this example :) –  Moon Sep 27 '12 at 23:36

No significant differences between the two -- purely a matter of opinion.

share|improve this answer
  1. it's the same
  2. It's done because in JS, the practice is to ensure that vars are declared in one spot, at the top of your function. Expressly because there is no block-scoping, and because of potential scope-chain resolution errors.
    The error wouldn't come from declaring var, but rather, forgetting to, and relying on block-scope to have your back (which it doesn't, because it doesn't exist).
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.