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I'm trying to make a chain reaction by executing next function after executing previous one. Code looks like this:

var med = {

    imgLoadTime : 2000,

    easingEffect : 'easeOutQuart',

    scrollEase : 'easeInOutQuad',

    effectDuration : 1000,

    currentPage : '',

    runAnimations : function(){
                        if(this.currentPage == '#slide5'){
                            this.initAssets();
                        }
                    },

    initAssets : function(){
                    $('#asset-1').animate(
                        {left : '50%'}, 
                        { 
                            duration: this.effectDuration, 
                            easing: this.easingEffect, 
                            complete: this.assetTwo 
                        });
                },

    assetTwo : function(){
                    console.log('two');
                    debugger;
                    $('#asset-2').animate(
                        {left : '50%'}, 
                        { 
                            duration: this.effectDuration, 
                            easing: this.easingEffect, 
                            complete: this.assetThree 
                        });
                },

    assetThree : function(){
                    console.log('three');
                    $('#asset-3').animate(
                        {left : '50%'}, 
                        {
                            duration: this.effectDuration, 
                            easing: this.easingEffect, 
                            complete: console.log('weszlo')
                        });
                }

};  

This is how my object looks like. Then I run function runAnimations as a property of object. What is weird that during this chain only assetTwo function executes, but no further (assetThree). Why so?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't do this type of definition:

complete: this.assetTwo 

It will call assetTwo, but it won't have the right this value. Instead, you need to do this:

           initAssets : function(){
                var self = this;
                $('#asset-1').animate(
                    {left : '50%'}, 
                    { 
                        duration: this.effectDuration, 
                        easing: this.easingEffect, 
                        complete: function() {self.assetTwo()}
                    });
            },

Same for the other complete functions. You need to save the value of this into a local variable and then use it in the complete function to invoke the next method. This will make sure that this is set properly for the next method.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - beat me to it. Another case of self = this! :) The reason self = this works is because the parent whose this the OP thought they were targeting will still retain the scope of self inside of the child functions. –  Travis J Sep 27 '12 at 23:37
    
thanks! again scope problem. ech, lovely js ;) –  jimmyweb Sep 27 '12 at 23:46
1  
@lesny09 - The value of this is set by the caller. In the animation complete function, this is probably set to the object that was being animated. Thus, in your original code when the complete occurs and assetTwo() was called, this would not be set to your object, but to the #asset-1 being animated. This would mess up the next item in the animation because this.assetThree() would not exist because it was the wrong this. Since it doesn't exist, it would stop the sequence. Saving the right value into a local variable and using that one guarantees that it gets the right this. –  jfriend00 Sep 27 '12 at 23:50
    
javascript is confusing me when it comes to scope issues. thank for clarifying this, though! –  jimmyweb Sep 27 '12 at 23:52
    
@lesny09 - just remember that this is controlled by the caller and that helps a lot, not by how you pass the function reference. –  jfriend00 Sep 27 '12 at 23:54

Your this changes with each function, you could reference it by med instead to get the desired result:

assetTwo : function(){

                //debugger;
                $('#asset-2').animate(
                    {left : '50%'}, 
                    { 
                        duration: med.effectDuration, 
                        easing: med.easingEffect, 
                        complete: med.assetThree 
                    });
            },

Updated fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/johnkoer/2KHnc/16/

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use med instead of this at all places in you javascript code.

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For nice tight code use a jQuery $.Deferred.pipe() chain as described here

You should end up with something like this :

var med = {
    imgLoadTime: 2000,
    currentPage: '',
    css : {left: '50%'},
    animOptions: {
        duration: 1000, 
        easing: 'easeOutQuart'
    };
    runAnimations: function() {
        if(med.currentPage == '#slide5') {
            $.Deferred(function(dfr) {
                dfr.pipe(function() {
                    return $('#asset-1').animate( med.css, med.animOptions );
                }).pipe(function() {
                    return $('#asset-2').animate( med.css, med.animOptions );
                }).pipe(function() {
                    return $('#asset-3').animate( med.css, med.animOptions );
                })
            }).resolve();
        }
    }
};

untested

Get the hang of Deferreds and you'll never look back.

Unless the med object is important for other reasons, then it would be simpler just to have runAnimations() rather than an object wrapper :

function runAnimations() {
    var imgLoadTime = 2000,
    currentPage = '',
    css = {left: '50%'},
    animOptions = {
        duration: 1000, 
        easing: 'easeOutQuart'
    };
    if(currentPage == '#slide5') {
            $.Deferred(function(dfr) {
                dfr.pipe(function() {
                    return $('#asset-1').animate( css, animOptions );
                }).pipe(function() {
                    return $('#asset-2').animate( css, animOptions );
                }).pipe(function() {
                    return $('#asset-3').animate( css, animOptions );
                })
            }).resolve();
    }
}

This way references to the fixed parameters are straightforward.

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Edited to simplify code –  Beetroot-Beetroot Sep 28 '12 at 0:43

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